Info

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

As Kobe Bryant once said, “There is power in understanding the journey of others to help create your own.” That’s why the Learning Leader Show exists—to get together and understand the journeys of successful leaders, so that we can better understand our own. This show is full of stories told by world-class leaders. Personal stories of successes, failures, and lessons learned along the way. Our guests come from diverse backgrounds—some are best-selling authors, others are genius entrepreneurs, and one even made a million dollars wearing t-shirts for a year. My role in this endeavor is to talk to the smartest, most creative, always-learning leaders in the world so that we can learn from them as we each create our own journeys.
RSS Feed
The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
2019
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: Page 1
May 26, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com 

#312: Zvi Band

Zvi Band is the co-founder & CEO of Contactually, the top CRM which empowers professionals in real estate, consulting, and other professional industries to build authentic relationships. Having founded Contactually in 2011, Zvi has led Contactually to $12M in venture backing, 75 employees, and tens of thousands of customers, including 8 of the top 20 real estate brokerages in the country. An engineer, a seasoned entrepreneur, developer, strategist and startup advisor, with unique both technical and non-technical operations. Thrice named a Washingtonian Tech Titan, featured in the New York Times, The Washington Post, and Washington City Paper, Zvi was also a finalist for Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year. Zvi is a passionate speaker and author whose writing has appeared in Forbes, Inc, Inman News, and many other outlets. He's the author of the newly released book, Success Is In Your Sphere.  Published by McGraw-Hill (Zvi and I share the same agent, publisher, and editor).

Notes:

  • Leaders who sustain excellence =
    • They have a level of introspection
      • This creates self-awareness and mindfulness
      • Take a step back... Analyze, pick apart.  Understand why something happened based on the decisions you made
    • They are tactical
      • 5x7 notepad -- Take blank sheet and write the exact things you need to do each day
      • Weekly wrap up -- Capture what happened
      • Use a daily journal to understand how you felt at that moment
  • "It's way too easy to be reactionary."  It's not productive.  Be thoughtful and intentional
  • Zvi at 25 years old:
    • Quit his job
    • His dad's cancer came back and he died
    • The same day was officially declared a recession in 2008
  • How to respond?
    • Zvi was interested in a startup
      • "I emailed my network, and the CTO of an enterprise software company helped me out"
      • "Relationships are our most important asset"
    • Zvi realized he wasn't good at managing his relationships.  He was using Evernote.
    • He wanted a proactive CRM (customer relationship management) tool to proactively work for the relationship driven professional
    • That was how Contactually was created
      • "It's not about staying in touch.  It's about being of value."
  • How to make the right hiring decisions:
    • It's values based:
      • Be user first - solve problems for others
      • Ownership - entrepreneur types
      • Learn & innovate - embrace failure and learn
        • Demonstrate the ability to learn
      • Be excellent with each other -- "If a company has a named 'No Asshole' rules then that usually means they have a lot of assholes there."  It's a red flag.
      • Keep it simple
      • Be real -- Transparent
  • How does someone demonstrate the ability to learn?
    • Run a mock call, give feedback.  They must be coachable.  How do they respond to the coaching?
    • Ask, 'what are you learning?
    • We want readers
    • We want people who are intellectually curious
    • We want people who have a "general dissatisfaction with their current skill set."
  • Mentor advice:
    • Leverage your experience to know the right questions to ask.
    • Teach them how to navigate the issues, don't just give them the answers.
    • "Relay experience.  Don't give advice."  Don't give a prescription.
  • Mentee advice:
    • Establish a feedback loop
    • Establish what to do -- follow up
    • "Must show that you took their insights to heart and acted on them."
  • The 'icky' feeling of relationship marketing:
    • Avoid this.  Don't just exchange business cards.
    • "Relationships are our most important asset."
    • Collect intelligence on those people important to you.  Listen for the little details they share.  Pay attention.  Take notes after you talk with them so you can ask about them later.
  • Consistency - Play the long game:
    • Create habits:  what are your relationship goals?
    • "We're wired to think short term."  Zag when others zig.  Think long term.
  • Build genuine, real relationships:
    • When we look back at success, we realize it's because of relationships
    • Invest in them long term
  • Contactually got acquired by Compass
  • Zvi and his investors have been rewarded for their work
May 19, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#311: Adam Savage

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com 

Adam Savage was the co-host and Executive Producer of the hit show, MythBusters on the Discovery Channel.  Fourteen years, 1,015 myths, 2,950 experiments, eight Emmy nominations and 83 miles of duct tape later, the series ended in March 2016.

 He is the author of Every Tool's a Hammer - Life Is What You Make It.

Be part of "Mindful Monday" -- Text LEARNERS to 44222

Notes

  • Leaders who sustain excellence =
    • "Obsession is the gravity of making"
    • Obsession towards the project -- A "desire to see the thing they made to your satisfaction."
  • Adam on failure:
    • "I don't trust people who haven't failed."
  • What it means to be a great boss?
    • Give great opportunities... "The time, the facilities, reason, and logic."
    • "Hey, you're doing great."  Let employees have the space they need.
    • "There's nothing better than when someone leading a team project can just run with it."
    • "Give total autonomy with narrow bandwidth.  Give ownership."
  • Being a generalist -- "The specialist wasn't always helpful because answers are within the context of a wider story."
  • It's very damaging to ask a nine year old what they want to be when they grow up:
  • The WHO
    • "I think about my relationships all the time."  The people you consciously choose to have in your life are everything
    • "Am I serving those relationships? Am I being present and non-judgmental with them?  Am I with them in the room?"
  • Stop getting mad at customer service -- It's not their fault.  And you'll feel better about yourself.
  • Adam on his preparation process for a big speech:
    • It depends on the engagement, but it's extensive.
    • There are 2 specifics:
      • Record yourself and listen to it -- "It illuminates where you're not hitting your mark.  It's the transitions typically.  How you link them together as a narrative whole."
      • Memorize conceptually -- Practice, practice practice.  Get the reps.
  • Communication as a leader -- "Story is completely vital to leadership in every way."
    • "Language was invented to tell stories."
    • Pay attention to how they people who move you tell stories
  • How playing quarterback is similar to a work of art
    • There is always something changing -- You must adjust on the fly
  • How to become more self-aware?
    • Write everything down -- Keep a journal of your thoughts.  Reflect.  Be introspective
    • Have someone on your team who will tell you the truth.  "It's all about the team."
  • How Adam lowered stress level:
    • Stopped drinking alcohol
    • Slept more
    • Started meditating
  • Increase your loose tolerance
    • Learn by doing -- Take action -- "Creation is iteration." Being wrong isn't failing
    • You don't have to have everything in place to start
    • Be easier on yourself during the iterations
  • Share everything:
    • We love the myth of the lone genius, yet none of us make stuff in a vacuum.  Share credit, ideas, everything.  Increase generosity through sharing
  • Use more cooling fluid:
    • It takes more time on the front end, and forces time to clean up on the back end, but it gives more value to the final product -- "It's a reminder to slow down and reduce the friction in your work and relationships."
  • Sweep up every day:
    • "A clean workbench gives energy.  It helps the future me."
    • Leave a place better than you found it
  • The cultural malaise currently is based on the scarcity model.  Wrong.  There is enough food, be a giver.  Be generous.
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea
May 12, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#310: David Epstein

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

David Epstein is the author of the forthcoming Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World , and of the top 10 New York Times bestseller The Sports Gene. David has master’s degrees in environmental science and journalism, and is reasonably sure he’s the only person to have co-authored a paper in the journal of Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research while a writer at Sports Illustrated.  David has given talks about performance science and the uses (and misuses) of data on five continents; his TED Talk has been viewed 7 million times, and was shared by Bill Gates.

Notes:

  • Leaders who sustain excellence =
    • Voracious learners
    • Voracious readers
    • They attack obstacles
    • Extremely interested in people and about themselves
  • The Sports Gene
    • Having great reflexes is a trained skill -- Pro baseball players cannot hit a pro softball pitcher because they have not trained their reflexes to understand the arm angle (Albert Puhols could not hit Jenny Finch even though she throws slower than the average MLB pitcher)
    • "Chunking" is what world class athletes or chess-masters do.  They pick up on cues from the person's body (or the board) and that helps them make quicker decisions -- Ex:  A baseball player understands/learns the cues of a pitcher and what pitch is coming and at what velocity
  • Sports is a "kind learning environment."  It is more black and white than the business world.  In order to translate this to the business world, try to create a kinder learning environment.  Need as much information available as possible.
    • Create an environment where feedback is happening on a regular basis
    • The business world is not as kind of a learning environment
    • The "annual review" is a horrible way to run a business.  Feedback should be happening on a regular basis... Daily.
    • Bill Campbell would go to the meetings of the leaders he coached and gave immediate feedback.
    • Create a feedback loop for yourself from mentors/people you trust
    • "Everyone needs a coach" -- David regularly takes writing courses to stay sharp and learn
  • David's writing process:
    • The first year = Read 10 scientific papers per day.  He reads a TON
    • Advantage David has created = An expansive search function
    • Have a "master thought list" -- Storyboard, shift scenes around
    • He did film editing as a form of cross training for writing a book and becoming a great storyteller
    • 29 of 32 NFL first round draft picks in the 2017 draft played multiple sports.  Cross training is critical for long term success
  • David debated Malcolm Gladwell on stage in front of a huge audience and changed Malcolm's mind.  Watch here.
  • Athletes that delay specialization excel more than those that specializes (golf is the only exception to the rule)
  • The most effective leaders are constantly updating their mental models
    • It should be celebrated when someone changes their mind because better evidence has surfaced
    • Darwin changed his mind
    • Lincoln changed his mind
  • A 'deliberate amateur' = Someone who loves an activity.  "I don't do research, I do search." It's a constant experimentation to learn
  • In a LinkedIn study, the results of a review of all profiles of people who made it to the C-Suite =
    • Went to a Top 5 Business School
    • "The single most important factor is they worked in different functions within a company."  They were generalists.
  • The people who make the most impact with number of patents filed work across classes.  They are wide ranging generalists.
  • Sales is a great entry point for any business -- Learning marketing and sales will benefit you in every job you will ever have
  • "Take your skills and apply them to a problem where those skills aren't being used."
  • People underestimate how much the world will change -- Must be able to adapt and learn
    • "We learn who we are in practice, not in theory."  -- Take action.  Do the work.
    • Work to accumulate experiences
    • Try something, go all in on the thing you are doing in that moment.  100% focus.  Invest everything you have in it.
      • Then reflect on it -- "We learn in moments of reflection."
  • "When you're 23, don't worry about getting ahead, get information about yourself.  Focus on learning."
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea
May 5, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #309: Verne Harnish - 

Verne Harnish is the founder of the world-renowned Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO), with over 14,000 members worldwide, and chaired for fifteen years EO’s premiere CEO program, the “Birthing of Giants” held at MIT, a program in which he still teaches today. Founder and CEO of Gazelles, a global executive education and coaching company with over 200 partners on six continents, Verne has spent the past three decades helping companies scale up.

He along with the editors of Fortune, authored The Greatest Business Decisions of All Times for which Jim Collins wrote the foreword. His book Scaling Up (Rockefeller Habits 2.0) has won eight major international book awards including the prestigious International Book Award for Best General Business book.

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com 

Notes:

  • Leaders who sustain excellence =
    • Ability to persevere
    • Willingness to hire a coach and listen -- All of the greats had coaches to help them (Rockefeller, Steve Jobs)
    • Be part of a "mastermind group" -- Think and Grow Rich - Napoleon Hill
  • Cannot be afraid to make the cold-call.  You must be willing to ask
    • Verne cold-called Steve Jobs leadership coach
  • Ask yourself:  Who are the top 25 influencers in the space where I want to play?  Write their names down... Then call them, email, writer letters.  Find a way to get in contact with them
    • Earn the support of influencers and it will put you in warp speed -- "I was the first person to get President Ronald Reagan to say 'entrepreneur' in the White House"
  • Two rules:
    • Give before you ask for anything -- Sometimes you can only give your time and attention.  Go to their speeches in person, sit in the front row, nod your head, take notes, then follow up with them afterwards and ask questions.
    • Understand your pitch, what you do, why you do it, and be able to share it concisely
  • "What a great mentor wants is a great student"
  • Verne realized there was not a curriculum for gazelles -- mid range companies that wanted to scale-up
  • Titan -- Rockefeller was so successful because of his discipline
  • Disciplined people, disciplined thought, disciplined action
  • Build a functional accountability chart... 4 criteria:
    • Will - Have to hire will to learn, succeed, persevere
    • Values -- Mars mission values
    • Results -- Track record of success
    • Skill - Fungible 
  • Strategy
    • One idea must be different, don't be just like your competition
    • Michael Porter advice -- Article in HBR, "What Is Strategy"
    • Strategy is rooted in... "What word or two do you own in the market-place?"
  • Execution -- Must act or it's just hot air.  Failure happens at this phase as you add people
  • Communication rhythm - "If you want to move faster, you need to pulse faster."  -- Have a daily huddle, agile meetings
    • There should be equal talk time of each person in the meeting.  Don't have one drone on for the entire meeting
    • "Want heated debate, conversation"
    • Run forums so each person speaks
    • Generalities versus Specifics -- It MUST be specific
    • Average 1 minute per person
    • 3 agenda items, to to each person
      • What's up the next 24 hours?  #1 priority -- Get the headlines
      • Updated daily metrics that drive the business -- Stat of attracting and keeping talent.  What's the data say?
      • Where are you stuck?  What's in your way?  Get them verbalized
  • The 3 Barriers to scaling up
    • Leadership
      • Awareness-- "What got you here won't get you there" -- Must learn to say no.  Have to let early clients go.  You can't have all the answers
      • Constraint between your ears -- Bill Gates does "think weeks"
      • Marcus Buckingham -- Understand your strengths and weaknesses.  Strengths give you energy, weaknesses take your energy.  "Focus on doing what you like, that gives you energy."  If you love working to solve client issues, then become the head of customer support and hire a manager to be the CEO
    • Scalable Infrastructure
      • Bloomberg office space -- Everything goes through the six floor so that people collide... To talk, learn, interact
      • Human brain -- Nobody wants a manager.  Set it up so all can be a leader and have autonomy.  Team of Teams.
      • November 2018 HBR Issue - The end of bureaucracy 
    • Marketing
      • Hi tech fast growth companies scale rapidly... Must have great marketing
      • Marketing is the single most important function -- Attract talent, investors, attention, customers
      • It takes a village of gurus -- Curate people
  • Advice:  "Make a list of who you need to hang out with... Write it down.  You are who you hang out with.  Move in with a mentor if you have to."

"Strengths give you energy.  Weaknesses takes your energy."

Social Media:

Apr 28, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #308: Alex Hutchinson

TEXT LEARNERS to 44222

Full shownotes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com 

  • Leaders who sustain excellence =
    • They show up... Willing to take a shot when they might not be successful
    • People over-estimate short term and under-estimate long term.  Be ambitious about long term
    • Consistency - Secret to success: "When an editor gives me an assignment, they will receive it back on time with the right words."  You have to always get it done and be known as someone who does this.
    • To rise above a certain level, you must do more than what is expected.  "Dream big while not neglecting daily responsibility."
  • Eliud Kipchoge - spiritual leader of self-disciplined people around the world.
  • "Only the disciplined in life are free."
  • Getting there earlier than his coach...
    • "As hard as I was willing to work, he was willing to support me." -- Alex describing his great basketball coach
  • "Discipline is a muscle.  You get better as you use it more."
  • Model of achievement -- Work hard, support others
  • "Sweat more than you watch other people sweat."  -- Every leader should get some sort of activity.  It's indefensible to have a healthy body and mind.
  • "We are cognitively better when we are fit."
  • "Pushing yourself physically reveals what you're made of mentally."
  • How to raise your threshold of pain:
    • It's expectation based
    • Pain perception is the same for all... It's all about how you respond
    • Learn to tolerate it it by going through it regularly.  Develop psychological coping system.
    • Pain is just a signal -- Understand it's how you choose to respond
  • Navy SEALs, Olympians did an experiment with brain scanners where oxygen was restricted:
    • They have a 'higher level of self-monitoring'
    • Elite athletes get better when stress hits.  Normal people get worse
  • Take a mindfulness based course:
    • Cultivate "non-judgmental self-awareness"
    • When you make a pancake for your 5 year old and they don't like it, "try not to respond with frustration in the moment.  Think about how you'll feel in 30 minutes."
  • Change in training?  "Training will be the same, but my mind will be different."
  • The importance of self-talk -- Inner monologue -- "I've trained for this, I can do it."
  • "When you've reached a point that you think you've hit a wall, in fact in almost every case, those limits are perceptions of effort."
  • Handle fear with preparation -- You must show yourself you have reason to believe you can do it.
  • Delayed gratification -- Sports is the clearest venues to see benefit of delayed gratification
    • "Champions in November are made in July."
  • Alain de Botton quote -- "Of many books, one feels, it could have been truly good, if the author's appetite for suffering had been greater."
  • Advice:
    • Read a lot of books... On topics that have nothing to do with your topic
    • Give self space to think
    • Give self time to be bored
Apr 21, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Text: LEARNERS to 44222 to be part of 'Mindful Monday'

Episode #397: Carly Fiorina

  • Leaders who sustain excellence =
    • Unlock the potential in others
    • Courageous
    • High character -- "How" matters more than what
    • Collaborate well
    • Humble/Empathetic
    • They see possibilities in other people... They don't judge them
    • Optimism combined with realism -- "Seeing people do more than they thought they can is fuel for me."
      • "You need an equal measure of optimism with realism.  You must see the current state as it is.  It's important to believe things will get better (optimism), but also be clear eyed and realistic.  Be honest.  See truth, and act on it."
  • From secretary to CEO -- "People wouldn't look at em and say that's a leader."
  • "Work hard and do excellent work in your current role."
  • "What I saw were problems and we fixed problems.  I learned that solving problems is what leadership is all about."
    • "Run towards the problems, work to solve them.  Don't fixate on getting promoted, focus your attention on doing great at your current job."  And then doors will open...
  • Choose a path over a plan
    • How you get things done matters more than what you get done... The manner in which you do it.  Think long term.
  • Focus on where you can make a difference
  • A manager versus a leader:
    • Manager -- Works within current constraints of the role.  They do the best they can with what they have.
    • Leader -- Changes things.  They create new ways of doing things.
  • Leaders are made, not born.  Focus on building character and working to be excellent
  • Carly was recruited to be the CEO of HP.  She was the first outside hire to be CEO ever.  And the first female CEO of a Fortune 50 company.
  • She was named the Fortune magazine most powerful woman in American business for 6 years in a row
    • "When your team is diverse, the team is stronger."
  • Competitive nature: "I've always been focused on excellence.  But, I've never been a win at all cost person."
    • "It's easy to make a quarter (in the business world, hit your mark for that particular quarter), but you need to get there the right way."
  • Criticism as CEO of HP
    • "When you try to change things, you will get criticized."
    • "Criticism is the price of leadership."
  • How to handle a board?
    • "A good board considers themselves a team, not a collection of individuals."  The HP board was a set of individuals and two of them leaked sensitive information to the press.  "Eventually, after I was gone, they got fired."
  • Debating with President Trump on stage at the Republican debates... How to be prepared?
    • "Every woman in the world heard what he said."
    • "You need to be prepared, but also be present.  Be able to use experience and instinct in the moment."
    • "I didn't prepare for the comment about my appearance, but being present in the room, and having good instincts helped me respond properly."
  • "Right now, we are confused what leadership is.  We see leaders who promote conflict, criticize, castigate others.  That is wrong."
    • "We need to be reminded who leaders are and what they do.  Leaders lift others up, they have courage.  Everyone can choose to be a leader."
  • The idea of privilege:
    • "We cannot judge someone by they circumstances.  Whether they come from privilege or they are poor.  We should judge them based on their character and their contribution."
    • "If we want to achieve more, if we want to be excellent, it requires people who are different to work together towards a common goal."  Shane Show's Dream Teams model for building teams.
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea
Apr 14, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
Episode #306: Brian Koppelman - Follow Your Curiosity And Obsessions With Rigor

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

  • Sustaining excellence:
    • Ability to focus on the work
    • Preparedness
    • Ability to collaborate
    • "Being responsible enough to show up on time is surprisingly effective and important"
    • "People that follow their curiosity, obsessions, and passions" -- They truly love what they're doing and work with incredible rigor.  If you love what you're doing, it doesn't feel like a job.  It's work that's enriching you at the same time.
  • "What we're really trying to do as leaders is get people to perform at their highest level and to do it together, because what we do is highly collaborative."
  •  "I was the kind of person that would read a book and if I liked it, I would stay up all night reading it.  And I would learn the words from that book.  I would look them up.  I loved the way words sounded and I loved the idea of communicating with great efficiency and humor."
  • "Where this passion really landed for me, it made sense to do this work.  Working with great rigor is a lot easier when you're borderline obsessed with something and when you're curious."
  • "Curiosity keeps you diving deeper."
  • "I was a frustrated and blocked writer and I was starting to feel that I had made mistakes.  But those two hours every morning... Writing. Made me feel alive."
  • "And he (my boss) said to me, 'Look, you know you're a writer and that's what you want to do.'"
  • "Dude.  You do have a half hour a day."  You have to make time to do the work.
  • "We finished the screenplay.  We sent it out and it got rejected by every single agency in Hollywood.  I'm not exaggerating."
    • "I  wrote down what every person said... And then it sold the next week, and every agency called us back trying to sign us.  Nothing was different on the page.  I read them all back what they had said and they would all lie back to me.  I had them written down on a big yellow legal pad.  I read them out loud on a speaker phone.  These guys all lied back to us. Nobody just said, 'well I guess I was wrong,' but then they all wanted to sign us.  It taught me a great lesson about gatekeepers in the world.  They don't always know."
    • "It means don't blindly accept negative feedback from gatekeepers."
  • Feedback -- "We have friends/peers in place to give feedback to each other."  John Hamburg (Meet The Fockers; I Love You, Man; Along Came Polly). "You want feedback, you need feedback. But you don't want feedback from that jealous old friend who you know secretly doesn't want you to be successful."
  • "I don't have people in my life who don't want the best for me.  We root for each other... Hard."
  • Comfort in your own skin:
    • "It's a lifetime pursuit.  It's so hard."
    • "The battle is to accept who you are while not giving up on improving yourself.  To continue to try to become the perfected version of you which you can never be.  And to accept your own frailties and faults."
    • "One simple place this comes from is to avoid lying.  My wife and I don't lie to each other.  We've never lied to each other. When you have that to start, it helps with the rest because you're not fronting."
    • "I do morning pages every day, I meditate, I take long walks and think."
    • "When you do all of those things and you live with intention, you start to become more comfortable with who you are."
    • "But each time you stretch and grow and you're rewarded, it encourages you to stretch and grow."
  • "Never Fake The Funk" -- "It's about pretending.  It's about lying to yourself.  Don't pretend, don't lie to yourself.  It's really easy to get swept along by other peoples conception of who you are. And by other people's ideas of what success is.  Defining success for yourself is crucial."
  • "Any interaction I have, I view as an opportunity for growth. For me and the other person."
  • Feedback is fuel... Hearing that you've helped someone is the fuel that drives this machine
  • Having successful parents and the expectations that come from that...
    • "My dad was very good at showing me what it took to be successful."
    • "For some reason, my dad would always point out, 'there's nothing worse than the son of a rich kid.'"
    • "I never wanted to be looked at as just the son of somebody and just skate.  I wanted my parents and sisters to be proud of me.  I wanted my kids to be proud of me."
    • "I learned at a young age how to talk to powerful people.  To find a way to make them laugh, to not be intimidated by them.  Because I grew up around those people, I knew exactly what they're like.  That's a gigantic advantage that I had because my father took me to meetings.  I watched people sell to him, and I watched him sell to others, so I learned what worked."
    • "My dad was a workaholic, but he really cared about us.  He never missed a ballgame.  He would go to New York City, work a full day, come home to Long Island, watch me play a decent third base, and then drive back to the city for a meeting.  I never wondered 'Is my Dad going to show up for the game, my dad always showed up for the game."
    • "I would never eat dinner until my dad got home.  If he was going to be home at 9:00, I would wait up, my dad would come home and we would talk about his day and about business.  And just hearing the stories enabled me now to be able to understand aspects of business."
  • "Whenever my son asked me to play catch, I would say yes."
  • "I always walked my daughter to school.  Those little things, kids knowing that, it gives you a kind of closeness. It's having the connection..."
    • "You don't have to start over, you're in the flow.  You always have this time."
  • Tell your kids, "You did well because you worked hard."  Don't say, "You did well because you're smart."  Compliment the work ethic.
  • Writing Billions on spec... You write it for free, you don't have a deal in place.
    • "We wrote it for us."
    • Showrunner = Responsible for everything you see on the television show.  Writing it, overseeing shooting of it, the editing, the design, all of it.  Leading 150 people on the show.
  • How to make hiring decisions?
    • "No assholes"
    • "We really check references"
    • The work has to be excellent
    • "We hire keys to run departments and trust the keys to hire their departments.  Hiring the keys is a lot of time and effort, a lot of meetings."
    • "I want to know that they're really going to kill for it.  I want to know that they're a good person.  That they'll get along with everyone.  We're all there lifting everyone else up.  So you need to know that everyone is there for the same reason.  'I love this show and I want it to be great.'"
    • How they hired Damian Lewis -- "We had three long meetings.  We each checked with people who had worked with each other.  We knew people loved working with him.  We knew he showed up prepared."
  • How to be creative and innovative... A collaborative process:
    • Recognize people when they do great
    • "The truth is 'hire people that are smarter than you.  You never pay a bad price when you hire people that are better than you.'"
    • "Part of not fronting, of not faking the funk, is admitting when you don't know the answer."
    •  "Let's get the best idea.  Let's source the best idea that we can."
  • Career advice:
    • "Do the work."
    • "Think about the story you want to tell and start telling it."
  • At thanksgiving, why should you not talk about your new creative endeavor:
    • "It's a lot easier to say I don't have the time than to say I'm scared to do it."
    • "Say what your dream is too soon and someone will shoot it down.  Train yourself not to do that."
  • Create a whole family (extended family) group chat
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea
Apr 7, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #305: Marcus Buckingham & Ashley Goodall - A Leader's Guide To The Real World (Break All The Rules)

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Marcus Buckingham holds a master's degree in social and political science from Cambridge University and is a member of the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on Leadership and Management.  He's the author of the international best-seller, First, Break All The Rules.

Ashley Goodall is the co-author, with Marcus Buckingham, of Nine Lies About Work: A Freethinking Leader’s Guide to the Real World.  He is an executive, leadership expert, and author, and has spent his career exploring large organizations from the inside.

Notes from this talk:

  • Sustaining excellence:
    • Optimism -- An innate predisposition that things will get better
    • Individualization -- Ability to attract great talent.  Knowing that each person has something unique to bring
  • "You follow somebody if they give you confidence in the future."
    • "The world will be better if I hitch my wagon to you."
  • Great managers/leaders =
    • They know how to surround themselves with the right people -- "If you want a great party, invite great people."
    • They focus on people first
    • They help them.  They coach them.  They find a path and set expectations.
    • They grow.  They make the next step and help others do the same.
  • "Talent is more important than experience."
    • Talent = a recurring pattern of thought.  Enduring patterns in a person.  Hire for those, then train for skills.
  • How to find talented people?
    • Ask open ended questions, stay quiet, believe what they say.
    • Ask appetite questions:  "What did you love most about that?"
    • Talents are far more about natural appetite
  • Feedback:
    • "People need feedback to grow and excel.  It grows best not with feedback, but with help."
    • People grown when attention is given to them.  "Pay attention to me.  My talents."  People need attention to what really works in them
  • Leaders must look at the real world
    • Idiosyncratic -- The best are...
    • There is a difference between theory world and the real world
  • "Learning is an emergent experience."  It's inside out... How you do your version...
  • How do you measure things that are hard to measure?
    • "Must make a distinction between traits and states."
      • Example of a trait = extroversion
      • Example of a state = mood, skills (can change)
      • Competencies are a combination of both
  • Being labeled a "Hi-Po" (high potential) in an organization:  "It's made up, not a thing.  Toxic because it presumes that some human brains can't/won't grow."
    • "There is no point in having the 'hi-po' conversation.  In talent reviews, ask for each person... How will they grow best?  Don't use a 9 box grid."
    • "Replace potential for momentum."
  • "Work life balance is a very weird aspiration.  It's very hard to do it perfectly."
    • "Balance is a way of being stationary.  It's not a good way to move through life."
    • "We shouldn't tell people to do this.  Health is motion, finding love, finding red threads."
    • "It draws you in.  You should move through life.  Draw strength from the movement."
  • "If a leader has no followers, they're not a leader." -- "Follow-ship is the thing."
  • "We all have fears for the future.  Find a leader that can see around the corner, we're drawn to that."
  • "Be a free thinking leader."

Social Media:

Mar 31, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #304: Laura Gassner Otting - How To Carve Your Own Path

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

The Learning Leader Show

"It starts young.  We have a world where we are given an identity. We need to think, 'is that really what I want?"

Show Notes:

  • Sustaining excellence:
    • Live on the edge of your incompetence -- "The more you talk, the less you listen."  Need to be asking questions and listening.
    • Tenacity, grit
    • Put yourself in uncomfortable situations
  • Be in a position to learn something new from your failures... "That is delightful."
  • "Looking into someone and seeing their greatness."
  • Running coach -- "Calm, confident, reflect back to the dream  Compete.
  • Issues with execution... Why? "We get stuck chasing someone else's dream."
  • How do we know? "It starts young.  We have a world where we are given an identity. We need to think, 'is that really what I want?"
  • The four parts of consonace:
    • Calling -- It's bigger than you
    • Connection - The work actually matters
    • Contribution - It contributes to the life you actually want
    • Control - How much do I have?
  • "My mother told me I needed to be a lawyer." -- "I wanted to run for office."
  • How did Laura end up in the Clinton Whitehouse?
  • "I learned how to show up for others... And be dedicated to excellence"
  • "I was a great leader, but a terrible manager."  You need to be self-aware
  • Advice to new managers:
    • "People want feedback.  Ask them if that project reflected their understanding of the assignment or their ability?"
  • Laura's TEDx Talk:
    • Stop asking, 'how can I help?'
    • Think, 'what needs to happen?'
  • Her fight with Ann Coulter
  • Must be willing to change your mind as a leader -- "Our stories are our connections."
  • Becoming an athlete -- Laura ran the first mile of her life nine years ago.  Now, she's a competitive rower.  And she ran in the Boston marathon.
  • Confidence is built through doing.  Continue to push the boundaries of our own competence.
  • Tel Aviv:
    • Hunger
    • Weight
    • Tenacity
    • Speed
    • Grit/Heart
  • Don't get in the comparison trap with other people's highlight reels on social media
  • Advice she received that's been helpful -- "You're just not that important"
  • Study -- Team of Rivals -- About Lincoln
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea
Mar 24, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #303 - General Stanley McChrystal

Full Show Notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

A retired four-star general, Stan is the former commander of US and International Security Assistance Forces (ISAF) Afghanistan and the former commander of the nation’s premier military counter-terrorism force, Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC).  In June 2009, the President of the United States and the Secretary General of NATO appointed him to be the Commander of US Forces Afghanistan and NATO ISAF. His command included more than 150,000 troops from 45 allied countries. 

Notes: 

  • There is a formulaic myth: Leadership is not what we think it is...
    • "I thought it was just behaviors, but that's too simplistic."
    • "Leadership is intensely contextual."  A great leader must adapt themselves to the situation.
      • "There's not a style that's perfect for every situation."  Vince Lombardi coached differently based on the team he was coaching.  Coach K (from Duke) is known to be incredibly adaptable and that's why he's succeeded year after year.
  • Important leadership qualities:
    • Great listener -- Pay attention.  Marinate in what's happening.
    • Have humility -- Think of the people you serve
  • Why General McChrystal went to West Point:
    • Dad, brothers, grandpa were all soldiers.  It's in the family.
    • He wanted to be an Army Officer
  • Stan struggled his senior year in high school.  He lived by himself, his mom had died.
  • His Freshman year at West Point, he didn't take the school part seriously and got in trouble.
  • He was almost kicked out of West Point.
  • However, he got extremely high peer review ratings:
    • His new tactical officer told him, "You're going to be a great officer" -- This was said based on how his peers had so much respect for him as a person.  That mentor reached him and made a significant impact on him.  "We all need someone like that."
  • The power of a mentor/leader who believes in you:
    • It's huge to have someone who mentally maps it out for you and believes in you.  Someone that takes time to get in your mind... To care about you.  It must be genuine, and when it is, it's powerful.
  • Team of Teams:  It's hard to scale a lot of small team. It must be organically connected.
  • The front line leader -- It's impactful to have a "front line obsession."  Be with your team.  Show them you care through your actions.  In order to fully understand the situation, you need to get out and see it for yourself.
  • We often don't have the answers.  "You can't fake it.  The role of the leader has changed.  It used to be command and control.  A leader is more like a gardener now.  You must orchestrate the pieces of a team, and ensure they are well connected."  You want a well connected, curious organization.
  • "If when you get on the ground the order we gave you is wrong, execute the order we should have given you."
    • The leader must educate the team to make wise decisions from the front line if the leader is somewhere else.  The leader must trust the team to make the right decisions in that moment.
    • "The leader still owns the outcome.  The reality is the team will do better if properly trained."  Create an organization of trust and speed.
Mar 17, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

302: Nick Kokonas - How To See The Genius In People

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • Intellectual curiosity - A desire to learn.  Not for the outcome, but for the curiosity to learn more
    • Healthy degree of paranoia - What Jim Collins would call "productive paranoia"
      • In the pursuit of excellence
    • "No one is giving it away for free.  It takes effort."
  • Balance -- "I get manic at times. I'm not always well balanced."  The skill is in being able to turn it on and off... Which can happen over time
  • "I've always been curious about how things worked..."
  • Why it was helpful to go to Colgate University
    • A Liberal Arts school forced Nick to study areas outside of just his major.  Made him more well-rounded
    • He "learned how to learn" -- Forced him to wrestle with existential questions
  • Rhetoric -- Can you understand all sides of an issue? Where does ambiguity exist?
    • Need to learn to think critically -- How you do it is more important that you do it
  • General advice:
    • "Learn to communicate well.  Concisely. Learn to write and speak well.
    • From a psychology perspective, analyze, "what are they really saying?"
  • Why he became a derivatives trader:
    • "I got into law school, but didn't want to go."
    • He tested well, but desired his independence
    • "Prestige as part of pay doesn't matter to me."
    • To be great at anything, you must be disciplined to show up everyday -- "My money has always been at risk everyday. Some think that's crazy.  But I've always worked to have an edge."
    • How to figure out outcomes as soon as possible
  • The decision to leave the world of derivatives trading to open a restaurant... Why?
    • "I took some money off the table... Then my dad died... and I thought, what am I doing?  I had no idea what I was going to do next..."
  • Meeting Grant Achatz and the impact that had on Nick's life...
    • "He reminded me a lot of myself.  He was thoughtful, driven, shy (this was the opposite), and he wasn't afraid of hard work."
    • "I think I have a skill to see the genius in some people."
    • "Grant's work is of artistic genius"
  • Doing what you love and are passionate about:
    • "For me the test is... When I wake up in the morning is it nagging at me to do it?"
Mar 10, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #301 with James Kerr

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • Humility - An ego-less approach. "Serve to lead" mentality
    • Curiosity - Following passion
    • Value Excellence - Focus on doing the small things right
    • These are transferable principles to any organziation
  • The "All Blacks" rugby team "are our Gods in New Zealand." 
    • They've won just under 80% of their games in history
    • Scored twice as many points as their competitors
    • The most successful sports team of all time
  • Sustained high performance
    • Mana = The God within.  The spirit... The ethos that creates excellence decade after decade
  • Surprises? "The softness in this hard game.  A love, a brotherhood, connection, meaning, caring for one another."
  • How have they sustained excellence?
    • Tradition
    • Starts at the top with the leaders
    • Breaking down old orthodox
    • Like the British SAS - "Rank but no class"
    • Leadership group -- It's not just one coach.  Everyone's ideas are valued.
  • It's a player led team - "Positive power of peer pressure."  That feeling of not wanting to let one of your teammates down
    • "You fight more for the person in the foxhole next to you."
    • The Spartan sword and shield.  You can lose you sword, but you can never lose your shield.  That helps protect your brother.
  • Accountability - There is leadership at every level
    • It empowers the individual in a project bigger than themselves
    • How does this work in business?
      • Helps them step up, take ownership, be responsible
  • "A leader is responsible for the result.  Good or bad."
Mar 4, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #300: Keith & AJ Hawk - How To Instill Work Ethic & Curiosity In Your Kids

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com 

Keith Hawk is a 32-year veteran sales professional and sales leader.  For over ten years he led one of America's greatest sales organizations, at LexisNexis.  He continues in a customer focused role to this day at that global organization, speaking to customer groups around the world on the topic of solving business problems with the solutions offered by his firm.  In addition, he continues to speak regularly on topics such as consultative selling, selling to executives, and how to effectively lead people.  He also happens to be my dad.

AJ Hawk played 11 seasons in the NFL.  He was a two-time All American at Ohio State and he also won The Lombardi Award (as a senior at Ohio State) as the countries best defensive player.  He was the fifth overall draft pick of the Green Bay Packers in the 2006 NFL draft.  He was voted team captain on their Super Bowl winning team in 2010.  He finished his career as the all time leading tackler in Green Bay Packer history.  AJ is my younger brother.

  • Staying sharp after official retirement?
    • "My mind is as clear as it's been in many years. I read more, write more, listen to more podcasts, I learn more now than I ever have."
    • "I never liked getting the question, 'did you get all of your work done?' As a senior leader at a big company, the work was never done. In my role now, I can go give a speech and get the work done."
    • Advice to others - "Stay patient a little bit, you have to find a way to grab hold of your day and take control of it.  Don't let others do that to you."
  • AJ's progress to improve as a broadcaster:
    • There is no end game
    • Must keep grinding and getting as many reps as possible
    • "You have to jump in and do the work." You can't worry about judgement from others. You have to get the reps. Get on the stage and do it.
  • How to handle the follow up to a competitive life in the NFL?
    • Must have realistic expectations... That amount of competition will never happen again.  That's okay as long as you're prepared for it
    • Broadcasting is a never ending battle with myself to get better.  To improve.  "I'm competitive with myself to get better."  Learning the intricacies from the greats.  "I've learned to be quiet, to let a moment breathe."
  • Why are walk-thurs so important in the NFL?  Why does a world class athlete need to walk-thru a step for over an hour a day?
    • “The tiny details consistently worked on everyday so they become instincts. In the moment you don’t have to think and just rely on the instincts you created.  That's why we did so many walk-thrus in the NFL."
    • Why my Dad went to Green Bay for his birthday week every summer? The famous Tom Hanks quote, "I could watch my son brush his teeth all day." And he loved watching world-class athletes work on perfecting their craft.
  • Listener question: From Tony Milenberger (member of one of my leadership circles) - With all the different directions you guys are going, how do you still manage to like each other? What rhythms keep you connected in the busy seasons?  How does it help your success?
    • We each have different roles and we've worked hard to do a great job at our role.  We all have creative outlets and have remained each others biggest fans.  We push each other to be better.  And when one of the family members reaches a level of fame and fortune (AJ), their ability to remain humble and down to earth is huge.  AJ has done that and created a ton of phenomenal family experiences because of it.
  • The process of earning my book deal with McGraw-Hill... How it all came about.  There was an instant huge belief from Casey Ebro, senior editor from McGraw-Hill.  I describe that conversation and why we chose to work together.
  • Listener question from Mike Flynn: What is your Dad's greatest hopes for his children and grandchildren?
    • Maslow's hierarchy
      • Economics taken care because of their hard work
      • Fulfilled life with a great spouse
      • Work stimulates us, gets us excited
      • Put our children in a place to be successful
      • Self-actualize -- Live up to what you want to do
  • How to handle a situation when you hit a rut?
    • When this happened with my Dad, he always wanted to get directly to the front lines.  "When times got tough, I scheduled days in the field to meet with our customers and our front line people.  I wanted to be reminded why they did business with us.  I wanted to break it down to the bare essentials.  How could I do this in a different way?  Meeting with them helped." Reminded of the quote, "if it's not broke, fix it."  Be proactive.  Billy Joel had this happen to him and he rediscovered his love when he went to a new fan base in Russia.
    • With AJ - "When I was struggling or kept getting caught in the garbage of the linemen in front of me, my coach, Winston Moss, would say, 'why don't you take a step back and see what the view is like from there?' A simple step back to gain a new perspective helped.

 

Feb 25, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #299: Kyle Maynard

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Kyle Maynard is a motivational speaker, bestselling author, entrepreneur, and ESPY award-winning mixed martial arts athlete, known for becoming the first quadruple amputee to reach the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro and Mount Aconcagua without the aid of prosthetics.

Oprah Winfrey called Kyle “one of the most inspiring young men you will ever hear about.” Arnold Schwarzenegger described him as “the real deal,” “a champion human,” and “one of the most inspiring people” he’s ever met. Even the great Wayne Gretzky has spoken of Kyle’s “greatness.”

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • Consistent action... Plotting
    • Life is a marathon
    • "I've struggled with this."
  • "We live in a society that we think we have to reach the summit"
    • "Climb as hard as you can but relinquish the fact that you've ever arrived."  It will never be enough to fulfill you.
  • "You've never arrived, you're always becoming."
  • "I question what we're driven towards."
  • Losing the first 35 matches... His dad told him that no wrestlers win in their first year and convinced him to go back for his second year
  • "What you're looking for, you're going to find."
    • A self-efficacy belief.  It's in your deeper nervous system... It becomes automatic.  His dad planted the seed.
  • "We have this illusion in our head, but it doesn't happen overnight."
  • "The world will not be tailored for your every need."
  • "We are softening the edges, we need to learn how to mentally deal with things."
  • "We need to choose conscious suffering."
    • "Voluntary hardship"
  • The power of meeting veterans in an airport on a way to giving motivational speeches
    • "It shifted, it wasn't about me."  The message helped veterans not commit suicide.
  • "It's B.S. to think anyone is self-made.  We all need help."  The ripple effect.
  • Why climb?
    • "I want to experience the world.  Just did scuba dive at the Great Barrier reef."
  • Crawling 19,340 feet in just ten days... Climbing Mount Kilmanjaro
  • "Focus on that next three feet in front of you..." Just the next step.  Before you know it, you put your head up and you're at your destination
    • Reminds me of Alison Levine -- "Just put one foot in front of the other and take that next step. Just keep going."
    • "I don't know if I have enough in the tank, but I'm going to keep going."
    • "The 3 feet in front of you is the only thing that matters"
  • "Anything is possible is a lie... Tell the truth, know how to test your limits"
  • "What gets measured gets done"
  • How long can you enjoy accomplishments?
    • "It's a weird dance."
    • "What I'm learning to do now is plotting the essence of it..."
  • Favorite book: Empire Of The Summer Moon
  • Fasting: "When you fast (don't eat), your body picks the weakest cells and eats them."  There is a lot of science to support fasting
  • Advice to others:
    • Value money but not too much
    • Have a small number of possessions
    • Namaste = "Light inside of me.  Recognize light inside of you."
    • Take calculated risk, go on adventures
    • "Follow your bliss"
Feb 18, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #298 with Michael Useem - How To Become A Learning Machine

Full shownotes can be seen at www.LearningLeader.com

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • Thinking strategically
    • Communicating persuasively
    • Decisive decision making
  • The power of using real life examples to demonstrate leadership
  • Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain
    • He was a learning machine
    • "We know not the future, and cannot plan for it much.  But we can determine and know what manner of men we will be whenever and wherever the hour strikes."
    • He was a self directed lifelong learner - "I have always been interested in military matters, and what I do not know in that line, I know how to learn. I study I tell you every military work I can find."
    • He had a mentor/coach - Adelbert Ames was his tent mate and he learned all he could from him
      • He had a disciplined focus on learning from him.  "I asked him every night to tell me what he knew so I could learn"
    • He routinely got outside of his comfort zone - "I will watch myself and do an after action review to analyze."
    • Get tangible experience
  • The purpose behind taking students and family members to Gettysburg every semester - To "stand where Chamberlain stood." And to "get you in their moment on that ground." Recreate the moment as if you're there.
  • Gene Kranz and Apollo 13
    • "Expecting high performance is a prerequisite to its achievement among those who work with you.  Your high standards and optimistic anticipations will not guarantee a favorable outcome, but their absence will assuredly create the opposite."
    • Being a decisive decision maker and preparing for those challenging moments with an attitude that "failure is not an option."
    • "I knew my teams even more than they knew themselves."
    • Had a great mentor in Chris Craft to help him
    • Teams that are well developed go through experiences together can outperform individuals under stress
  • The motivation behind risk takers:
    • "A calculating adventurer, deriving a thrill from taking a risk and watching it pay off."  This is how visions are created.
    • How to become savvy about calculated risk
    • Risk tolerance is a learned skill
  • Persuasive communication is an art form
    • It's a learned skill
    • You can't hide, you must be persuasive as a leader
    • There needs to be a solid narrative (story), a purpose behind it
    • Every person must know how important their specific contribution is -- "Why are we doing this and what is my role?"
Feb 11, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#297: Tero Isokauppila - CEO Of Four Sigmatic: Principled Based Leadership

Full show notes can be found at www.LearningLeader.com

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • "They love what they do" -- Love the process.  The work
    • Humility/Excitement to learn -- they know things will change and they must adjust
    • Listen more than you talk.
    • Curiosity -- The Dalai Lama exemplifies this very well.
    • Able to adjust -- Madonna is a prime example of being able to adjust and reinvent herself
  • How being a 13th generation farmer from Finland helped set the course for Tero's life -- "I have domain knowledge."
  • Finnish people consume more coffee per capita than anyone in the world
  • The idea of putting mushrooms in coffee came because of this
  • Super foods help with:
    • Hormonal response
    • Gut health
    • Immune system
  • Four Sigmatic is a company built with super foods
  • The beginning -- "It all comes down to value generation.  If you want to generate value, you have to see what others don't yet see."
  • Culture -- "You need to rally around people who believe in the mission."
  • Find believers and sponsors as your first employees -- his founding team were former teammates
    • Get to know you team deeply -- how they think, feel, act, what motivates them
    • Currently they have a fully distributed team of 37 people
  • The hiring process and qualities they look for.  Four lenses:
    • Can they do they job? -- Skills
    • How will they fit in our culture? -- Fundamentals
    • What do they cost? -- Financially and emotionally
    • What is their growth potential?
    • They must be "extra good" at communication - written and verbal.  How do they write emails?  Must be extra organized.
  • "Culture exists whether you want or not.  It is what it is."
  • Their principles:
    • S - Stay healthy, eat well, exercise
    • W - We are us, not them
    • A - Always carry product
    • R - Results with freedom -- KPI
    • M - Make it grow, let it go
  • Examples of innovation
Feb 4, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #296: Emily Fletcher - The Secret Superpower Of Top Performers (Meditation)

For full show notes, go to www.LearningLeader.com 

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • They have a magnetic quality.  Others are drawn to them.  People look to them.
    • They have the ability to shift their state of being.  Not just being calm.  They are able to be variable and can adapt to situations
  • Meditation increases adaptability
    • Meditation helps you take care of yourself
    • Rest, nurture your brain and body
  • The failure of most when they attempt to meditate:
    • Emily is on a mission to rid the world of "ex-meditators" -- people who have tried and failed and given up on it
    • There have been 58 million downloads of meditation apps
      • Free apps are gentle by design and not as useful
  • Advice -- There is a difference between mindfulness and meditation.
    • "Meditation is a tool that helps you get rid of stress from your past."
    • Mindfulness is "the art of bringing your awareness into the present moment"
  • Meditation gives your brain and body tools.
    • "Kind of a nap sitting up. Mind alert, body getting rest." -- Relieve stress from now and past
    • It is not a toy.  It's a very powerful tool.  You need proper training
    • It's ridiculously simple, yet powerful
  • Biggest misconception  -- "People think they have to clear their head.  They think thoughts are the enemy.  That's not true."
    • "People think they are too busy to meditate... You know we're talking about your brain right?"
  • Emily was on Broadway for 10 years... Living in constant state of anxiety... Sick, insomnia, was miserable.
    • She noticed another performer had none of those issues.  She asked what she did and found out meditation was the key...
      • Emily took a class, and liked it so much she went to India to be trained professionally.
  • She created Ziva... An online meditation tool.
  • It's about manifesting "consciously creating the life you love"
  • "Don't water the weeds" -- Don't focus on the wrong things
Jan 28, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#295: Todd Herman - Using Alter Egos To Transform Your Life

To read the full show notes, go to www.LearningLeader.com

Notes:

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • "Negative capability" (John Keats term)
      • The ability to pursue your dream despite the fact that circumstance tells you it won't happen.
      • Not losing faith despite the long odds
      • Mental toughness - "The ability to be flexible & adaptable despite what the world is throwing at you."
  • The OPP framework for goal setting:
    • Outcome
    • Performance - Resources
    • Process - Who, what, when, where
  • What Todd does?
    • He's on a mission to give people smart thinking models.  He helps ambitious people.
    • Revenue generation: He's built programs and systems and licensed it to sports teams
    • He does sport science and peak performance coaching
    • Grew up doing speaking competitions.
      • Did 68 speeches in 90 days.  All for free.  Have to "get the reps"
  • "This is how I know I've made it... I loved doing a free speech for four people.  I loved it!"
  • "You must show up.  Continue to show up no matter what.  Even if nobody is there, show up anyway."
  • "The answers are never waiting for you to sit still. The answers are out there doing it.  It's action that matters."
  • How Todd developed strong mental toughness?
    • Rough upbringing -- He was sexually abused at a church camp when he was 12
    • He retreated and developed mental toughness to deal with it
  • Skills developed as an athlete that translated to life outside of sports:
    • Preparation
    • Routines
    • Visualization/Imagery
  • Why are alter-egos so powerful?
    • They help you get into flow state and not get out of your head
  • The Bo Jackson story -- "Bo Jackson never played a down of football.  It was Jason from Friday The 13th.  I was crazy out there."
Jan 21, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #294: Warren Berger - How To Ask More Beautiful Questions

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • Intelligent... Smart
    • Hard-working
    • Ambitious
    • Humble -- This is a really important quality.  No ego or arrogance.  They admit when they are wrong.  Willing to acknowledge when they're wrong.  They are open to listening to others and their ideas.
    • Curiosity - They are not trapped by their own expertise.  They are open minded, curious, looking around.
    • Able to adapt
    • Communication skill -- The willingness and ability to ask great questions
  • The genesis of becoming a questionoligist -- Warrens calls himself a questionoligist.  The art and science of asking questions.
    • He originally was a journalist and developed a skill for asking questions doing that job.
    • "Questioning was a tool of the trade"
  • Warren was writing about design and the idea of questioning kept coming up with leaders in business.
    • "The ability to ask good questions would lead them thru the innovation cycle."
  • The holy trinity of questioning:
    • Why?  Trying to understand
    • What if?  Ideation, brainstorming
    • How?  Get practical.  "How can we take the first step?"
  • Big open ended questions -- They are the stems
    • Each one does something completely different
  • Questioning as a manager:
    • Find time to have the conversations and ask questions of your team members
    • Must be thoughtful and prepared
    • We've gotten out of the habit of being questioners, and now it's always about doing.  "Slow down, ask questions.  Why are we pursuing this strategy? Understand why?"

Go To www.LearningLeader.com

Text LEARNERS to 44222

Jan 14, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #293: Brent Beshore - How To Get Rich Slow & Live An Optimal Life

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • The usual things like: integrity and hard work
    • But the best... "know how messy they are, they challenge themselves, they have high level of self-awareness, they need people around them to help.  They acknowledge their imperfections, and they give others grace for their imperfections."
  • How to develop self awareness? 
    • Surround yourself with people who will tell you the truth -- "We are all highly imperfect."
    • Give people a true open invitation to criticize, but they also must be constructive, loving, kind, thoughtful people.
      • "They need to be rooting for you."\
  • What do you look for in someone to work with?
    • Curiosity - an inherent desire to know more, learn, reconstruct reality
    • Self awareness - genuine intellectual honesty
    • Integrity - function of consistency over time.  Have to reconstruct it
Jan 7, 2019

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #292 - Beth Comstock: You Don't Need Permission (Former GE Vice Chair)

Beth Comstock spent nearly three decades at GE. As Chief Marketing Officer and then Vice Chair of Innovation, she led efforts to accelerate new growth, develop digital and clean-energy futures, seed new businesses and enhance brand value.  As President of Integrated Media at NBC Universal, she oversaw TV ad revenue and digital media efforts, including the early development of Hulu. Prior to this, she held roles at NBC, CBS and CNN/Turner Broadcasting.

Her first book, Imagine it Forward, was published in September 2018. She is a director at Nike, and trustee of The National Geographic Society. 

The Learning Leader Show

"You must grab agency.  You don't always need permission."

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • "They don't stop. They keep coming back.  There is an inherent belief that tomorrow is another day.  They have great stamina."
    • Examples: Jeff Bezos (Amazon), Mary Barra (GM)
  • What was it like being hired by Jack Welch (including the story of Jack offering her the big promotion)
  • "You know you can't say no to Jack Welch and GE.  It fascinated me."
  • Jeff Immelt -- "He lives to deliver for the customer"
  • Take us back to 1985... Beth is in her mid-20's, she's hiding behind the door as her husband tells her mom that they are getting a divorce.
    • "It was a defining moment.  I was willfully choosing an unfamiliar path.  It felt like a failure."
    • "In times of change, you have a choice to figure it out."
  • JR, the bad boss... We've all had bad bosses.  How to deal with it? "He was a gatekeeper, just said no.  So, I wrote a report, shared it with others, gave it to him.  He rejected all of it.  So I left to go to Ted Turner's CNN."
    • "You must grab agency.  You don't always need permission."
  • "No means 'not yet'"
  • The difference between gatekeepers and goalkeepers:
    • Goalkeepers clear the way, they help you.  Gatekeepers do the opposite."
  • Common mistakes the new manager makes and how to avoid them:
    • Understand the responsibility
    • Find a way to be secure in yourself.  A lot of mistakes are made out of insecurity.
    • "I was not good at giving feedback.  Good or bad.  I didn't communicate well initially."
    • "You need to get to know your team very well.  Know them as individuals.  Connect with them.  People don't want to be managed or controlled, they want to be led. There is a difference."
    • Mentors: "I was a 30 year old first time manager and I didn't have good mentors.  I was afraid to reach out to people for help.  Find a series of people to be your board of advisors.  You will need it."
  • The "Steve Jobs recruited me" story -- "This was right before the iPhone came out.  He said, 'We're going to do some really big things here and I want you to be part of it.'  It wasn't right for my family to move out there at that time though.  I made the pro and con list and the move was too powerful.  So I said no.  There are days where I regret it."
  • The difference between Jack Welch and Jeff Immelt:
    • "Both were good leaders.  Jeff championed people and fully supported me."
    • "They led in different times.  It's a shame that they get compared when they led in two completely different eras."
  • "Tell me something I don't want to hear." -- Why this is a powerful exercise all leaders need to do with their teams on a regular basis.
    • "Success theater" was an initiative.  It's meant to crack bureaucracy.  "Jeff Immelt was actually trying to make it better through doing this.  You need that feedback loop."
  • Hiring:  What does Beth look for in a candidate?
    • Curiosity - Open and eager to learn
    • A quest for excellence - Do they actively strive to be better?
    • Others provide references on their behalf
    • Trial run - "Try, then buy."  Simulate the role
    • Hire someone who knows what you don't - Hire for your weaknesses
  • How to handle an environment as a woman leader surrounded by men?
    • "I'm a creative woman.  I came to appreciate my differences.  I became this small, quiet, rebel. Forge a different path.  Learn how to get comfortable doing this."
    • Advice to men? "I'm so glad you're asking this.  Be open.  Listen.  Talk with females at work. Have open dialog.  Ask questions how you can do better."
    • "Assume nobel intent."
  • How to "imagine it forward?"
    • "Data is squeezing imagination from us." -- "Open yourself to new people and ideas."
    • "Pattern recognition"
    • "Scenario planning"
    • Think "What if I were the customer? What if I were the competitor?  What would I do?"
  • Leading as an introvert.  Most great introvert leaders have these useful qualities:
    • Introspective
    • Good listener
    • Understand how to manage their energy
      • Find time to recharge
  • Why joining The Learning Leader Circle is a good idea
  • Use the "Get To Know You Document"

"I'm a creative woman.  I came to appreciate my differences.  I became this small, quiet, rebel. Forge a different path.  Learn how to get comfortable doing this."

Social Media:

Dec 31, 2018

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #291: Andy Rachleff (CEO Wealthfront) - What Do You Uniquely Offer That People Desperately Want?

Andy Rachleff is a co-founder and Executive Chairman of Wealthfront. Rachleff co-founded Benchmark Capital in 1995 and was a general partner until 2004. 

Some notes... (More found on www.LearningLeader.com)

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • Intellectual curiosity -- Pass this along to kids at the dinner table
    • Ask questions
    • "Bright people think other smart people ask questions."
  • The leader creates the culture
  • "People model the behavior of the leader."
  • "To be a great teacher, you have to synthesize something into small statements.  This helps you be a better leader."
  • Magic 8 Ball statements
    • "A's hire A's. B's hire C's."
Dec 24, 2018

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

#290: Scott Harrison - Redemption, Compassion, & The Transformative Power Within Us All

Scott Harrison is the founder and CEO of charity: water, a non-profit that has mobilized over one million donors around the world to fund over 28,000 water projects in 26 countries that will serve more than 8.2 million people. Harrison has been recognized on Fortune's 40 under 40 list, Forbes' Impact 30 list, and was ranked #10 in Fast Company's 100 Most Creative People in Business. He is currently a World Economic Forum Young Global Leader. Scott’s first book, Thirst, was released in October (2018) and immediately hit the New York Times best-seller list.

Dec 17, 2018

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #289: Philip McKernan - Relationships Move At The Speed Of Vulnerability

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of sustaining excellence:
    • Moments where they feel like a fraud, question themselves.  They are more comfortable within those moments
      • This allows them to bounce back quicker
    • They seek and attract things that are outside of their normal comfort zone
    • The Picasso example -- The courage to face the failure and own up to it
  • "Vulnerability is the only way to truly deepen relationships"
    • "When you say, "I don't know," it helps others feel empowered to help"
  • Philip felt worthless at age 14. He felt isolated and alone, a burden to try and fit in.  "That pain had a purpose."
    • How to go from an isolated and alone 14 year old to a keynote speaker who moves people to tears?
  • How to deal with skeptics?
    • "That's okay. But, I would address it now. Couples typically wait five years too long to get counseling.  Do it now."
  • What do you do? "I create environments for people to go deep. I meet them where they're at."
  • The story of starting this business on the side in an Irish pub.
    • "The hardest time of my life was at the beginning, but I didn't allow lack of money to impact what I did."
    • "What are you willing to give up to do what you want?"
    • "I stopped making the journey about me... It was about them."
  • Why Philip will not send his kids to college...
    • "Spend time learning. You need to understand who you are. A classroom is not built on how to get to know who you are."
  • The "Planes, Trains, & Automobiles" test:
    • Kevin Bacon started his career with no lines... But kept working. "Be willing to put in the work. Run for the cab."
  • Is "follow your passion good advice?"
    • "Yes and no.  There is a big difference between excitement and passion.  I believe we all have gifts and so many people use their talents."
    • "For you, sales was a talent, but your gift is connecting with people. To lift them, to help them, to build confidence."
    • "We are all leaders but a lot of people lead from an inauthentic space. It's not what we do, it's how we do it."
  • What is One Last Talk?
    • "If you had 15 minutes left to live to share your message, what would you say? You need to share with the world to free yourself."
    • The process creates freedom.  People want to connect.  This is "team deepening."
  • Why write a book?
    • "Everyone has the capacity to make an impact. I believe all of us carry some demons."
    • "It's like five years of therapy in one book." "The book is by me, but it's not for me.  I will never sign it."
  • "One of the greatest burdens a child can bare is the unlived life of their parents."
Dec 13, 2018

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode #288: Robert Greene - The Laws Of Human Nature (Part 2)

"I knew at eight years old I wanted to be a writer. It took me 30 years to find the right ideas. Everybody has a primal inclination." - Robert Greene

"If you're not excited about the field you work in, you'll learn half as much." -- Robert Greene

www.LearningLeader.com

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next » 13