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The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

As Kobe Bryant once said, “There is power in understanding the journey of others to help create your own.” That’s why the Learning Leader Show exists—to get together and understand the journeys of successful leaders, so that we can better understand our own. This show is full of stories told by world-class leaders. Personal stories of successes, failures, and lessons learned along the way. Our guests come from diverse backgrounds—some are best-selling authors, others are genius entrepreneurs, and one even made a million dollars wearing t-shirts for a year. My role in this endeavor is to talk to the smartest, most creative, always-learning leaders in the world so that we can learn from them as we each create our own journeys.
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Feb 19, 2018

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk:

Episode 245: Maria Taylor - ESPN Gameday, Embracing The Grind, The Value Of Versatility

Maria Taylor is in her sixth season as a host analyst & reporter. In the fall of 2017 Taylor will enter a new role as co-host on ESPN's College Gameday and sideline reporter for ABC's Saturday Night Football.  

Show Notes:

  • How to quickly build rapport with the people you interview?
    • Be prepared with a purpose, truly try to learn about them as a person (quickly), it's not just about their sport or their job.  Care about them as a person
    • Being viewed as an athlete -- "It's helpful working in the sports world that they know I played sports"
  • "As an athlete I was always a perfectionist, I always over prepare."  -- Maria sending her producers a copious amount of notes -- thoughts on situations/games/ideas
  • How to earn promotions quickly? "I never said no to anything.  I was never too big for any game."
    • Maria did high school football games, ACC digital.  She's traveled everywhere, stayed in bad hotels, etc.
      • "You have to be comfortable in the grind, you can't get discouraged."
      • "If I'm not doing something (work wise), I feel wrong."
  • Why Kirk Herbstreit is the best in the business -- "He's the most invested person I've ever seen.  He's always the most prepared person."
  • Adnan Virk "Always show up." -- "They remember how you made them feel."  Be conscious of that
  • Balance?  It will never be perfectly balanced.  Think of it as a stew - vegetable and beef... Certain bites are vegetables and other times it's beef.  That's work-life balance.  There are moments where it is all work, all day, every day.  There are other times where you can relax at home.  It's never a perfect 50 50 balance.
  • The story of Maria making the decision to be a sports broadcaster as a junior in college at Georgia... And then also earning her MBA as a backup plan!
    • She grew up loving sports.  Her dad played college sports.
  • Maria was recruited to play both volleyball and basketball at Georgia.
  • Our mutual feeling about the structure of being "in season" and how the routine helped us get better grades.
  • The first 90 minutes of Maria's day:
    • Start the day with gospel music (worship/faith)
    • New York Times daily podcast
    • Joyce Meyer podcast
  • Why do multiple jobs? (Gameday, sideline reporter, women's basketball studio host)
    • To diversify -- "I don't want to just be one thing.  It's an opportunity to flex different muscles."
    • "I try to investigate to find the best answer"
    • "I like challenges"
  • Person most enjoy interviewing?
    • Nick Saban.  "I try to steer him off the line he's trying to stay on."
    • Receiving coaching as a broadcaster... Who provides it?
      • SEC network producers
      • Feedback is just as important to what you put into your body.  It needs to be healthy and helpful -- "What are we filling our minds with?"
  • How to handle "Twitter haters?"
    • "Sometimes I'll put them on blast..."
  • What is an ESPN Gameday production meeting like?
    • A cast of characters - (listen around the 43:00 minute mark to hear the inside scoop)
  • Winning Edge Leadership Academy
    • Helping young women and minorities in broadcasting
    • Focused on student athletes
    • Doing a retreat in Miami
  • The sense of responsibility Maria feels as an African American woman
    • "Being black.... Half time spent assimilating and half time spent helping your people."
    • The Jemele Hill story at ESPN... Maria's reactions

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Feb 12, 2018

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk: Bill Curry is a two-time Super Bowl Champion. As an NCAA coach, Bill was named National Coach of the Year at Alabama and later became the first head football coach ever at Georgia State. As an ESPN commentator, he regularly shared his thoughts with a worldwide audience of millions. When Bill talks of discipline and success, his life experience is proof-positive of the effectiveness of his methods. Bill played for some of the greatest coaches of all time, including Vince Lombardi, Don Shula, and Bobby Dodd. His teammates included legendary players like Willie Davis, Bart Starr, and Johnny Unitas. Bill has studied the lives and methods of his personal heroes from past generations, ranging from Helen Keller and Rudyard Kipling to Theodore Roosevelt and Goethe. When Bill talks of leadership and success, his is a personal message molded by his extraordinary mentors and role models.  He is also the best-selling author of TEN MEN YOU MEET IN THE HUDDLE: LESSONS FROM A FOOTBALL LIFE. 

"Everyone has the will to win, but not everyone has the will to prepare."

Show Notes:

  • The 6 common characteristics of champions =
    • Show up - on time, be early, every time, be punctual, read to be your best
    • Singleness of purpose - Vince Lombardi, "his focus was powerful"
    • Unselfish - Bart Starr - "he literally gave the shirt off his back for others"
    • Tough - Don't make excuses, be great in the 4th quarter, never blame anyone else
    • Smart - Prepared, always last person off the field.  Johnny Unitas and Raymond Berry did this
    • Never quit - Never give up
  • FEAR?  Prepare out of fear? - "There is some truth to that."  "Everyone has the will to win, but not everyone has the will to prepare."
    • Personality, GRIT, Heart, Soul -- "Keeping prepping when others aren't"
  • The difference between good and great coaches?
    • Bobby Dodd (Georgia Tech) was a great coach.  A great coach can change your life.  They study the game so intently.  They intimidate other coaches with their brain.
    • Vince Lombardi would not tolerate prejudice or racism.  He had more African-American players than anyone else.  He was so precise in his methodology.
    • Don Shula had the ability to build relationships with each player
  • How can this be translated to the business world?
    • Reach inside the souls of the leaders -- the gift we have is "Magna Nimitas" -- Greatness of spirit.
      • Each person has a unique spirit - it's beautiful.  WE have brilliance within us.
      • Directly challenging the leaders to understand their people
      • Narcissism destroys leaders
  • Bill sat down with his players and went over their goals
  • We all need to have our own board of personal advisors, mentors
  • Bill's 4th year at Georgia Tech -- John Robert Bell said "I know you can play/" --> The impact that had on Bill was immense
  • Bill as a mentor -- He loves doing it.  He hears from at least one play every single day
  • Being humble -- "I know two types of people.  People who are humble and those who are about to be humbled." -- "Ray Nitschke humbled me pretty good"
  • The huddle - We need every teammate on every play to survive.  The huddle is a metaphor for our culture.
    • Why does the huddle matter?  "You can't be racist, sexist, everyone is part of that huddle."
  • Unique exercises Bill does at companies -- Understand each individual unique finger print, joining hands across aisles
  • The importance of intellectual curiosity and asking questions -- "People ought to be skeptical... Ask questions"
  • "There is a fellowship of the miserable.  I love them, but I avoid them."
  • Success?  His wife has helped him understand what success is... It used to be winning games.  He was miserable when he lost.  She taught him that's not a rational way to live.
    • Now success is "Am I making a contribution to the well being of others?"
  • Important marriage advice -- Do what you're told and what you say you're going to do.  Learn to listen.
  • Learning Leader - "I love that title!"

"Success = "Am I making a contribution to the well being of others?"

Social Media:

Feb 5, 2018

The Learning Leader Show - Annie Duke is a woman who has leveraged her expertise in the science of smart decision making to excel at pursuits as varied as championship poker to public speaking. For two decades, Annie was one of the top poker players in the world. In 2004, she bested a field of 234 players to win her first World Series of Poker (WSOP) bracelet. The same year, she triumphed in the $2 million winner-take-all, invitation-only WSOP Tournament of Champions. In 2010, she won the prestigious NBC National Heads-Up Poker Championship. Prior to becoming a professional poker player, Annie was awarded the National Science Foundation Fellowship. Because of this fellowship, she studied Cognitive Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania.

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence =
    • Open-minded to people who disagree with them
    • They ask "Why am I wrong?"
  • Using "I don't know" or "I'm not sure" shows immense security in oneself.  Great leaders do this.
  • The "half life of facts" should never be 100% certain -- "It does you a disservice in becoming more knowledgeable if you are certain you are right"
  • Hidden information -- Invite others to share information with you... To collaborate
    • "Here's what I think, but I don't know..." --> We're trained from an early age that those are dirty words, but they shouldn't be. We're supposed to always know, but having that mentality limits what you can learn
  • Put systems in place to allow exploration of alternative strategies
    • Do a deeper dive, consider all reactions. This will help you prepare in case something goes wrong.  You can put plans in place by acting in this manner
  • Why write Thinking In Bets?  Annie has a unique background: cognitive psychology, professional poker, decision making under pressure.  In poker: decision making is fast and furious (a hand of poker is 2 minutes)
    • "Learning occurs when you make a decision and have feedback"
  • The art of boosting academic research with stories and popular culture -- Seinfeld, The Super Bowl
  • Listen to the disagreement Annie and I have in regards to Pete Carroll's decision to throw a pass on the goal line at the end of The Super Bowl (around the 24:00 mark)
  • Most people are "resulting."  They are not measuring the decision making process with all the facts, they just view the result.  That is wrong.
    • Resulting - "Using the outcome as the sole determination if the decision was good or bad"
    • While Annie and I disagree, we both had an open mind to what each other had to say and considered the other person's point of view
  • A good approach in your business = Analyze the decision making process prior to knowing the result
  • Example: If a number of people are interviewing the same candidate (separately), the boss should wait to offer her opinion until the end.  Her thoughts will skew the feedback she needs from her teamCommonalities of great CEO poker players = They don't think they're good at poker.  They recognize they aren't as good as the pros and they work to put themselves in higher odd situations to "get lucky." (Listen around 45:00 to get the full context)
    • How to be a good head's up poker player?  Recognize your strengths and weaknesses vs that particular opponent.  If you deem they are better than you, then look for "coin flip" situations (example: Ace King vs a pair of 7's).  If you are better than your opponent then avoid coin flips and extend the match.  The longer the match, the better the odds for the better player to winThe importance of accountability:
      • How often does someone spout off without thinking?  If you follow that up with, "You wanna bet?"  How do they respond?  They probably rethink what they've said.  We should always "think in bets."  Think of our decisions as being "bet worthy."  If someone says, "You wanna bet?"  We should be in the position to say yes.  If we're not, then we need to rethink what comes out of our mouths and the decisions we are making.
      • "A bet is just a decision based on a belief that you think is how something will turn out."
      • If we think in bets, it forces us to seek out as much information as possible prior to making a decision.
      • That is a good thing and will help us make better decisions

"A bet is a decision based on a belief that you think is how something will turn out."

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Jan 29, 2018

Sustained Excellence = "They're over themselves" - They do not have an ego. They figure out the big truths, get over feelings, have clarity, vision. Great communicators - Like an athlete, they can be obsessed.  Keenly aware, active listeners, intentional with actions.

  • Why write The Culture Code?
    • Spending time around great teams and businesses, "I love the vibe, it's different." Had a desire to understand how that happens.  How to create trust"Typically we think of culture as in your DNA or not, but it's not.  "Great culture is something you can learn"The competition with Dan's two brothers growing up led to this fascination and curiosity with building great team culture"We routinely deeply underestimate our environments and the effect they have on us."
      • "As leaders, we need to create the conditions for excellence"The 3 Skills -- 1) Build Safety 2) Share Vulnerability 3) Establish Purpose
        • Build Safety - Why do a group of kindergartners do better than a group of CEOs?  The kindergartners have now agenda or care about credit.  They focus on doing the best work.  CEOs (in the study) were worried about who got credit and tearing each other down.
          • Safety is the single most important piece of foundation needed for great culture
          • Greg Popovich overdoes the "thank yous" - He regularly says thank you to the members of his team.
          • A painstaking hiring process - The single most important decision is "who's in and who's out."
            • You should script the entire first few days of a new employees time at a company -- Pixar example (20 minute mark) -- "At Pixar, we hired you because we need you to help us make our movies better."
          • John Wooden would routinely walk the locker room and pick up trash
        • Share Vulnerability - Functional notion that's so important
          • "Sharing a weakness is the best way to be strong" -- Navy SEALs example: The AAR (After Action Review)
          • The most important 4 words a leader can say, "Anybody have any ideas?"
            • Also, "I screwed up"
          • Over-communicate expectations
            • "We shoot, move, and communicate
            • "The only easy day was yesterday"
          • How to be a great listener
            • "Your goal as a listener should be to add energy." Ask questions, don't just sit there and nod.  Listen and absorb.  Help them leave higher than when you arrived.  Follow up to go deeper.  Being a great listener is a heroic skill.
            • Have "empathy and energy" as a listener -- dig in to assumptions (unearth)
          • Aim for candor, but avoid brutal honesty - good groups care about relationships, not brutality.  Candor is a better word
          • "Culture: From the Latin word cultus, which means care."
          • Great teams are made up of players who don't want to let their teammates down.
            • Greg Popovich and other great coaches disappear on purpose to let their team figure out it through tough moments.  Smart leaders create opportunities for teams to struggle and figure it out. --> "The leaders job is to make the team great without him/her."
          • Build a wall between performance review and professional development -- When you combine the two, you get neither.  Toggle, create safety so you can be more open and honest.
          • Establish Purpose
            • What's important now?  You must define that
            • Value statements aren't super useful -- "fill the windshield with a story."
            • Clear narratives guide attention
            • Name and rank your priorities
Jan 22, 2018

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Episode 241: Austin Kleon - How To Steal Like An Artist

Austin Kleon is the New York Times bestselling author of three illustrated books: Steal Like An ArtistNewspaper Blackout, and Show Your Work! His latest release is The Steal Like An Artist Journal: A Notebook For Creative Kleptomaniacs. His work has been translated into over twenty languages and featured on NPR’s Morning Edition, PBS Newshour, and in The New York Times and The Wall Street JournalNew York Magazine called his work “brilliant,” The Atlantic called him “positively one of the most interesting people on the Internet,” and The New Yorkersaid his poems “resurrect the newspaper when everybody else is declaring it dead.” He speaks about creativity in the digital age for organizations such as Pixar, Google, SXSW, TEDx, and The Economist. He grew up in Ohio, but now he lives in Austin, Texas.

"Reading is so essential to writing... I don't even think about it.  I just always do it."

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence =
    • "I wrestle with jealously about others who do better work than me... Until I realize it's very rare to see someone who doesn't deserve it based on how hard they work."
    • The people who sustain excellence are typically the hardest workers over the long term
    • "If you want to do better, work harder."
  • Austin's ritual
    • Write a page a day like Stephen King
      • Little bits of work add up over time
      • When you do something you love, you're always working... It's an endless stream
      • "I try to be a good boss to myself" -- But there is no punching the clock in and out... It's always in
  • Steal Like An Artist
    • Wrote an article titled "10 things I wish I had known when starting out" -- That became the best-selling book
      • The blog post and speech that went with it went viral
  • The Creative Process
    • Daily writing... Eventually show the audience to test if it's useful for them
  • "It's like a factory"
    • Collect
    • Make time to write
    • Gather to longer piece to essay
    • Put it out to the world
    • Collect feedback (live audience sometimes)
  • A daily blog helps the book writing process
    • Collect, synthesize, make, share -- "Stealing & Sharing"
  • Reading is a massive part of the writing process... Must read a lot
    • "Reading is so essential to writing.  I don't even think about it, I just do it."
  • "My job as an author is to point people to things people haven't seen"
  • "Being a leader... You have to be curious... You have to find great stories and examples." -- You must read a lot to do this
  • What advice do you give to others?
    • "You need hobbies... People used to have hobbies, not they have Netflix."  Try to restore something, do work, have a hobby -- It will build creativity
  • The two desks
    • Analog desk -- pens, markers, paper, scissors... Make stuff
    • Digital desk -- computer
  • "Walking is an insanely creative activity"
  • Enjoying captivity -- Be useful on train rides, flights... No wifi
  • The open office plan is a nightmare for an introvert like Austin
  • "You want hearts, not eyeballs." -- Focus on engagement of your audience, not just the size of it.
    • "The number of people doesn't matter as much as the quality of the people who follow you."
    • "Becoming a friend of someone you look up to is one of the best things that could ever happen"
      • Creating great work gives you the opportunity to do this

"You want hearts, not eyeballs." -- Focus on engagement of your audience, not just the size of it.

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Jan 15, 2018

The Learning Leader Show

Todd Henry is the founder of Accidental Creative, a company that helps creative people and teams be prolific, brilliant and healthy. He regularly speaks and consults with companies about how to develop practices that lead to everyday brilliance. He is the author of four books (The Accidental Creative, Louder Than Words, Die Empty, Herding Tigers), speaks internationally on productivity, creativity, leadership and passion for work, and build tools for creative people and teams. In short, he's an arms dealer for the creative revolution.  His latest book is called Herding Tigers: Leading talented, creative people requires a different skill set than the one many management books offer. As a consultant to creative companies, Todd Henry knows firsthand what prevents creative leaders from guiding their teams to success, and in Herding Tigers he provides a bold new blueprint to help you be the leader your team needs. Learn to lead by influence instead of control. Discover how to create a stable culture that empowers your team to take bold creative risks. And learn how to fight to protect the time, energy, and resources they need to do their best work.  

"Great leaders have great rituals. Great leaders are connected. Great leaders have set questions they ask when they meet someone for the first time."

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence =
    • Great leaders have great rituals
      • Disciplined time to study/reflect
      • Well read
      • Go on walks
    • Great leaders are connected to their network
    • Great leaders have set questions they ask someone when they meet for the first time
  • Todd's rituals
    • Same breakfast everyday, same coffee mug everyday
    • 1 hour of study/read/time to think
    • Writes morning pages (3 full pages long hand)
  • Creating space for yourself
    • Predictable space, a buffer - "I have a ritual of taking a long walk in the middle of my day" -- "It helps me get lost in thought"
  • Set questions to ask when you meet someone
    • "What's the most important thing I should know about you?"
    • What's inspiring you right now?"
  • Cover bands don't change the world
    • Go out and present YOUR ideas to the market place
    • "If you want to have a voice in the market place, you have to have a voice" -- You can't just regurgitate what others say: Take what you learn, synthesize it with your own thoughts and have a voice, a point of view
      • "Your synthesis is what is valuable"
  • Writing The Accidental Creative was hard and lonely
  • Leading Creatives - We assume they get it... No, you must be clear that they do.  Walk them through your thought process, what you expect, why you expect it
  • Brian Koppelman (Creator of Billions) - Leading with influence vs being a micro-manager.  The director must own the show... They must have a compelling vision, point of view. Koppelman must create the space to give the director of each episode that ownership (he owns it all)
  • Creative people need two things
    • Stability - Protect them, give them the space they need, be clear
    • Challenge - Cannot allow boredom
    • These two exist is constant tension, push/pull.  You have to know how/when/why to turn the dial on each
    • "Your entire career, up until you're a manager, you have complete control -- As a manager you must shift from control to influence (it's hard) or the team cannot scale beyond you
  • Your team must understand the WHY behind what you do -- If not they just inherit tactics but don't know why they do it.  It can't scale without knowing the WHY
  • Need to make certain creative people feel ownership of the work
    • Influence is about principle
  • Why is implementation and execution so hard?
    • Leaders struggle with insecurity
      • "Your area of greatest insecurity can inflict the most damage to your organization... It's about ego more than confidence"
  • Why write Herding Tigers?
    • "I wrote the book I wish I had... A lot of people don't have the model of what great leadership is"
  • Here's what it feels like right now:
    • Action
    • Pause
    • Reflection
    • Redirection
    • Action

"Cover bands don't change the world.  Find your own voice."

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Jan 8, 2018

Episode 239: Dan Pink - The Scientific Secrets Of Perfect Timing (When)

Daniel Pink is the author of six provocative books — including his newest, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, to be published in January 2018. His other books include the long-running New York Times bestseller A Whole New Mind and the #1 New York Times bestsellers Drive and To Sell is Human. His books have won multiple awards and have been translated into 37 languages.  If you'd like to listen to the first time Dan joined me on The Learning Leader Show, CLICK HERE.

Dan's TED Talk on the science of motivation is one of the 10 most-watched TED Talks of all time, with more than 19 million views. His RSA Animate video about the ideas in his book, Drive, has collected more than 14 million views.(from DanPink.com) (Photo Credit - HOW Design)

The Learning Leader Show

"It's like brick laying.  I show up every day and I hit my word (count) goal.  Day after day after day.  Every day."

Show Notes:

  • Dan's book writing process:
    • "It's like 1930's football... One short play at a time."
    • Brick laying, very laborious...
      • Get in office by 8:30 and hit the writing (word count) goal every single day... Day after day after day after day...
      • Write 700 words a day, every da
        • "I show up and hit my number, every single day"
    • Combining research with interesting stories -- work in chunks, have research in a Word doc, and the book in a separate doc. Review, go back and forth
    • Go through the (printed out) research, highlight, underline, review a lot
    • If you do this every day, it adds up
  • Why write about this topic? The topic of When
    • As a writer, you must pick a topic you are VERY interested in... You spend years on the project (research, writing, speeches)
    • "I wrote this book because I wanted to read it"
  • How to know if an idea is worth exploring?
    • "You don't... But when you share it with others, does it create curiosity in them?  Do they ask follow up questions?  If they do, you may be on to something"
  • The 3 stages of our days
    • Peak - Analytical work, smart
    • Trough - The afternoon "Bermuda Triangle" -- A bad time to make decisions
    • Recovery - A creative time
  • Why lunch is the most important meal of the day -- This is a time where you need to leave what you're doing, go outside, go with a friend, disconnect from work, don't look at your phone, need to recharge
  • Breaks are enormously important - Social breaks (with friends) are better than solo breaks
  • Napping for 20 minutes in the afternoon is very helpful
    • Drink a cup of coffee, set you iPhone for an alarm to go off in 23 minutes, lay down with an eye mask.  If you fall asleep in 5 minutes, you get an 18 minute nap, and you wake up and the caffeine starts to kick in
  • Why NBA players who get more "touches" have more success than others... Scientific evidence supports this
  • The importance of endings... How we end things:
    • Energize - More 29, 39, 49 year olds run marathons than any other age.  People want to end on a high note
    • Encode - Evaluate and record experiences - How something ends is very important. Look at Yelp reviews -- People remember the experience for how a meal ended more than anything else
    • Elevate - People prefer rising sequences. Dan's favorite tip:  When sharing good news and bad news, always START with the bad news, and end with the good news
  • We are very intentional about who, what, why... why aren't we intentional about WHEN?  We should be...

"We are very intentional about who, what, and why.  We aren't intentional about WHEN.  We should be."

Social Media:

Jan 1, 2018

The Learning Leader Show

Episode 238: Neil Pasricha - Why Action Creates Motivation: 1,000 Awesome Things

Neil Pasricha is the New York Times-bestselling author of The Happiness Equation and The Book of Awesome series, which has been published in ten countries, spent over five years on bestseller lists, and sold over a million copies. Neil is a Harvard MBA, one of the most popular TED speakers of all time, and after ten years heading Leadership Development at Walmart he now serves as Director of The Institute for Global Happiness. He has dedicated the past fifteen years of his life to developing leaders, creating global programs inside the world’s largest companies and speaking to hundreds of thousands of people around the globe.

"Most think motivation leads to action... No, motivation doesn't cause action... Action creates motivation."

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • C -- Clarity - Clear, succinct, memorable
    • O -- Optimism -- "Find the good in everything"
    • P -- Patience -- Delaying decision making until the last possible moment
      • The quality can improve if "we let the tension live"
  • Empower others - "Parkinson's Law" - Work rises to the time needed to complete it.
  • "I don't want to fight the customer."  -- Thinking about everything from their perspective. Wal-Mart
  • Being a Harvard Business School graduate
    • "Chase the companies that don't come to Harvard to recruit.  You'll learn more." -- Why Neil went to Wal-Mart
  • Neil's 30 second pitch to why someone should hire him for a leadership role when he was very young
  • "I had to be artificially confident"
    • His pitch -- 3 quick questions
      • Do you value internal promotions?
      • What's the #1 program you've seen?
      • Would you be interested in topics of developing leaders at Harvard?
        • Get their email address and follow up
  • None of the companies were hiring when he was leaving school... Neil had to "create a job" within companies to get hired
  • Brene Brown - "If you go through life trying to find confirmation you don't belong, you'll find it."
  • 2008 - The world was falling apart, his marriage ended, his best friend committed suicide..
    • He started the blog, 1,000 Awesome Things
    • Won a webby award for best blog in the world
    • Wrote The Book Of Awesome
  • He moved to NYC... Didn't know anyone, lived alone
  • He was going through pain while starting the awesome things blog.  Focused on three things:
    • Make the blog public - hold him accountable
    • Use a countdown - From 1,000 to 1 -- Helped him know it was going to end at some point
    • Finite - There is light at the end of the tunnel
  • "Most think motivation leads to action. Not true. Action creates motivation."
  • The importance of consistency - Neil's idea was not unique, but doing it everyday made him different from most
    • "Try to be receptive of other people's ideas" -- Helps you "notice things"
  • "Your questions are fantastic.  I'm not surprised."
  • Working on deadlines -- Neil wrote for a newspaper for four years.  Helped with this skill
  • "I believe in consistency"
  • Actionable advice: You have three, 56 hour buckets of your week.  They are:
    • 56 Hours - Sleep
    • 56 Hours - Work/Job
    • 56 Hours - What are you spending this time on? You can do whatever you want...
  • The happiness equation - Work/Life balance fulcrum -- Flywheel
  • Taking his side hustle and making it his full time job -- "I should have done it sooner."

"If you go through life trying to find confirmation that you don't belong, you'll find it." -- Brene Brown

Social Media:

Dec 25, 2017

The Learning Leader Show

Episode 237: AJ Jacobs - The Power of Irrational Confidence (Life As An Experiment)

A.J. Jacobs is an author, journalist, lecturer and human guinea pig. He has written four New York Times bestsellers that combine memoir, science, humor and a dash of self-help.  He is also editor at large at Esquire magazine, a commentator on NPR and a columnist for Mental Floss magazine. He is currently helping to build a family tree of the entire world and holding the biggest family reunion ever in 2015.

In addition to his books, Jacobs written for The New York TimesEntertainment Weekly, and New York magazine.

He has appeared on OprahThe Today ShowGood Morning America, CNN, The Dr. Oz Show, Conan and The Colbert Report.  He has given several TED talks, including ones about living biblically, creating a one-world family, and living healthily.

"It's easier to act your way into a new way of thinking, than think your way into a new way of acting."

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Self delusion -- Optimism helps you do incredible things.  Acting "as if"
      • "It's easier to act your way into a new way of thinking, than think your way into a new way of acting."
    • Great curiosity -- "I'm curious about everything... Even things that don't interest me."
  • Why he read the entire Encyclopedia Britannica
  • Why the "good ole days" actually sucked -- Studying this made him very grateful for being alive today
  • The practice of radical honesty and how it got him in trouble -- He was forced to tell the full truth at all times
    • Can be good or bad
  • Gratitude -- Common among the greatest achievers -- be thankful for everything. "When you're grateful for something as small as the elevator door opening, you're much happier."
  • It's All Relative -- Building a world family true.  How we are related.  How he is related to President Barack Obama...
    • It helps with perspective and tolerance... We're more tolerant of people we are related to
    • The Global Family Reunion event
  • Why his experiments drive his wife crazy -- The year of living biblically -- Why it was so hard to follow the exact words of the Bible
  • Harvard studies -- If we share DNA, people are more open to help one another
  • Why we need to get out of the echo chamber
  • Typical day -- stretch, treadmill desk, write and walk at the same time, walking keeps him alert
    • Importance of "walks with wife" -- raises serotonin
  • Batching activities -- Phone calls
    • It's lonely as a writer... AJ needs to speak with other creatives often: "I need to bounce ideas of of others in between the alone time"
    • Doing "Skype" lunches.  He eats lunch with friends over Skype
  • Best advice he's heard: From George Clooney -- "When I get up to bat, I don't think Am I going to hit a home run? I think, where will I hit this home run?" -- The importance of irrational confidence.  Delusional optimism is helpful.
  • Stage presence (when speaking) -- Why you "owe it to the audience" to think "you're the baddest dude on the planet" and will deliver for THEM

"When I got up to bat, I didn't think, "Am I going to hit a home run?" I thought, "Where will this home run go?" -- George Clooney on the importance of self confidence

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Dec 18, 2017

Episode 236: Brian Scudamore - CEO of 1-800-GOT-JUNK: How To Scale A Business

Brian started his business in Vancouver, Canada at the age of 18, and later went on to franchise 1-800-GOT-JUNK? as a way to expand operations. Today, 1-800-GOT-JUNK? has 1000 trucks on the road throughout some 180 locations in Canada, the United States, and Australia.

Brian has received wide recognition in the media and business community. 1-800-GOT-JUNK? has celebrated appearances on the highly-acclaimed Undercover Boss Canada, Dr. Oz, Dr. Phil, CNN, ABC Nightline, the Today Show, The Hour with George Stroumboulopoulos, and the View. His story has been told in Fortune Magazine, Business Week, New York Times, Huffington Post, and Wall Street Journal, to name a few. 1-800-GOT-JUNK? is currently the starring junk removal attraction on the hit A&E reality show, Hoarders.

Brian has brought his entrepreneurial success story to many conference stages, including the Fortune Small Business Magazine’s national conference. A strong believer in personal and professional development, Brian graduated from MIT's four-year Birthing of Giants program, and has subsequently completed several years of MIT’s BOG’s alumni program, Gathering of Titans. He is also a participant in a nine-year executive education program at Harvard University through YPO Presidents’ University. (from 1800gotjunk.com)

The Learning Leader Show

"I don't know if you can live the full potential if it's a side hustle. You need to give maximum effort."

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Focus - All in, not a side hustle
    • Faith - Belief in self, clear vision
    • Effort - Discipline
  • Why we all need an "MBA" -- A "Mentor Board of Advisors"
  • Fred DeLuca -- Subway founder - He never took his eye off the prize. He struggled and kept going. 32 stores in 12 years.
  • Are entrepreneurs born or made?
    • Brian started a carwash as a kid.  He sold candy in his dorm room
  • Creativity as a Dad -- Always build things with your kids and watch them grow together (ie. a garden)
  • Why did he start 1-800-GOT-JUNK?
    • Needed money for college... Initially called it "The Rubbish Boys"
  • Brian learned more about running a business from actually doing it than he did in school
  • The amazing story of Brian's dad "falling out of his chair" when he told me he was leaving school to run the business full time
    • "It couldn't be a side hustle."  The need for maximum effort to be successful
  • How Brian views opportunities
    • And where he thinks of new ideas to create more businesses
  • The importance of going on walks
  • Meeting outdoors in Vancouver -- "Get your muscles moving"
  • Morning routine -- Get up at 5:55
    • Power hour
    • Focus on self
    • Exercise
    • Study French, Italian (other languages)
    • Spend moments learning before the kids wake up
  • Side hustle -- "I don't know if you can live the full potential if it's a side hustle. You need to give it full effort. Imagine the possibility if they quit their job"
  • Philosophy on sales? Mentor Jack Daly -- "Ask questions and listen"
  • How he got his first 100 customers
  • "I have the best job in the world for me"
  • Brian's hiring process
  • Why he fired his entire team of 11 at one point -- They didn't have the right attitude
  • "Everyone must pass the beer and bbq test" -- "You have to want to have a beer and eat bbq with them"
    • "I want friendly, ambitious, passionate, optimistic people."
    • "Hire for attitude, train for skill"
    • Brian is the "culture" interviewer
  • Cameron Herold -- Best man in his wedding, previous business partner.  Brian shares why he had to fire him. "You cannot have 2 "fire, ready, aim" type of people."
  • The process of making mistakes on his path to hiring the right team
  • The need for Erik Church as the COO -- He is an executor.  They are a great yin and yang
    • Take a sheet of paper and write down what you enjoy doing and what you're good at.  Also write what you don't like doing and you're bad it.  Find the person to fill those gaps.  Erik does that for Brian
    • How to handle disagreements?
  • Birthing of giants - MIT -- Annual learning, monthly call
  • The importance of being a lifelong learner, be curious, ask questions
  • Book to read, The E-Myth by Michael Gerber

"I hire friendly, ambitious, passionate, optimistic people. Hire for attitude, train for skill."

Social Media:

Dec 11, 2017

Episode 235: Dr. Gay Hendricks - How To Make The Big Leap

Gay Hendricks, Ph.D., has been a leader in the fields of relationship transformation and bodymind therapies for more than 45 years. After earning his Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Stanford, Gay served as professor of Counseling Psychology at the University of Colorado for 21 years. He has written more than 40 books, including bestsellers such as Five Wishes, The Big Leap and Conscious Loving (co-authored with his co-author and mate for more than 35 years, Dr. Kathlyn Hendricks), both used as a primary text in universities around the world. In 2003, Gay co-founded The Spiritual Cinema Circle,which distributes inspirational movies and conscious entertainment to subscribers in 70+ countries.

Gay has offered seminars worldwide and appeared on more than 500 radio and television shows, including OPRAH, CNN, CNBC, 48 HOURS and others. In addition to his work with The Hendricks Institute, Gay is currently continuing his new mystery series that began with The First Rule Of Ten

Episode 235: Dr. Gay Hendricks - How To Make The Big Leap

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

"The money became an effortless byproduct of doing what I love"

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Openness to learning
    • Great listener
    • They do not waste time being defensive
  • The makeup of insecure people who won't learn = Fear. A bug --> You poke it, it curls towards the center.  They are scared.  We have the same nervous system from many years ago
    • Must acknowledge the fears -- "Don't try to out argue them or "out-facts" them"
    • "Speak to your shared fears" when scared
    • The 4 things we do when scared:
      • Fight
      • Runaway
      • Freeze
      • Space out
    • Fear tries to take us out of the moment
  • His story of going on the Oprah show -- "Being on Oprah was like having 10 shots of espresso"
  • What is the upper limit problem? A point in success/happiness -- if you go past the point of it, you do something to knock yourself down.  Fears keep people locked in certain zones
  • The 4 Operating Zones
    • Zone of incompetence
    • Zone of competence
    • Zone of excellence
    • Zone of Genius
  • Most love to do? "Living full time in the zone of genius"
  • Why you should start with "10 minutes of what you most love to do" -- Then continually bump that time up
  • Making the leap -- Freedom, pressure. Stand up, walk your talk.  So rewarding, but can you make money?
    • "The money became an effortless byproduct of doing what I love"
  • Walk quietly and with passion... Auspicious things happen
  • Life rewards expression of true genius
  • Early 90's, Gay spent 30% of time in his genius zone, then 50%, then 70%, now 90% of time is spent in his zone of genius
  • His zone of genius? "Be a model of creativity.  Explain complicated things in a simple way."
    • Oprah called it "Learning to love yourself"
  • Creativity - Conscious loving ever after -- How to access more creativity? Every day after 50 is a choice between creativity and stagnation. Move, play, create new ideas.  At age 65, Gay started lifting weights.  Must keep moving your body
  • He wrote his first mystery novel at age 65 (Wow!)
  • He just sold the mystery series to Netflix to turn it into a television series
    • It's never too late to start accessing new paths of creativity
    • Put your mind on how to create more
  • Learning Leader = "Commitment to learn from the moment"

"Life rewards expression of true genius." 

Social Media:

Dec 4, 2017

The Learning Leader Show

"As the leader, you are responsible for EVERYTHING that happens in your organization."

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • Humility
    • Constantly looking to improve
    • Learning
    • Willing and able to take criticism
  • Incredible story of a mutiny within the ranks because of a platoon commander's ego
  • Way Of The Warrior Kid - The message for children
    • Be humble
    • Don't give up
    • Work hard
  • Ramadi -- The epicenter, insurgency in Iraq
    • The confusion/fog of war
  • A firefight... Between friendly forces: Who's at fault?
  • Jocko took ownership - "As the leader, I'm responsible for everything that happens on that field. It wasn't your fault, it's mine."
  • "If you make a mistake, you must own it."
  • Owning the mistakes created confidence and trust with Jocko's boss
  • How do you handle a bad boss?
    • Make them look good
    • Ask for feedback, advice, ask for their approval, build them up
    • Isn't that manipulation? "Yes..."
  • "It's not just what you preach, it's what you tolerate."
  • Decentralized command -- Empowering junior leaders to make important decisions. Front line leaders must be empowered. Why? Speed
    • Being empowered as a quarterback to call an audible -- Why this was an optimal way for us to attack a defense and ultimately win games. The coaches needed to trust and empower me to do this
  • Are leaders born or made?
  • Characteristics of great leaders?
    • They take complex things and simplify them
    • They are articulate
    • They are loud (seems strange, but it's true for military leaders and a quarterback)
  • How much can you learn?  You must detach emotion, and be decisive.
  • Why wake up at 4:30 am? "It is time for me to own, it's before everyone else is awake"
  • Favorite part of work? - Podcasting and working with companies
  • How has Jocko created this lifestyle? -- Many years of consistent, sustained work
    • "Discipline Equals Freedom."
  • His discipline for many years has helped him create a lifestyle that he loves

"It's not just what you preach. It's what you tolerate."

 

Social Media:

Nov 27, 2017

Episode 233: Gretchen Rubin - How To Be Happy

Gretchen Rubin is the author of several books, including the blockbuster New York Times bestsellers, Better Than BeforeThe Happiness Project and Happier at Home. She has an enormous readership, both in print and online, and her books have sold almost three million copies worldwide, in more than thirty languages. Fast Company named Gretchen Rubin to its list of Most Creative People in Business, and she’s a member of Oprah’s SuperSoul 100.

She’s been interviewed by Oprah, eaten dinner with Daniel Kahneman, and walked arm-in-arm with the Dalai Lama.

Gretchen Rubin started her career in law and was clerking for Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor when she realized she wanted to be a writer. She lives in New York City with her husband and two daughters.

The Learning Leader Show

"What do I want from my life? I want to be happy. How can I be happier?"

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • They are self aware
    • They are happy and healthy and figured themselves out
  • Better Than Before -- How to create great habits
  • "I can't have a little.  I either have none or a lot."  -- Needed to abstain from things like that (sugar)
  • Think -- "What do I want from my life?" "I want to be happy..." She then went to the library to study. Did a deep dive on happiness
    • What are the keys to happiness?
    • Every month (for a year), she created a theme for the month: 3-5 concrete resolutions she could measure to make herself happier
  • Aim higher -- "Enjoying the fun of failure" -- Starting a blog. Initially worrying that nobody would read it. "It's okay to fail."
  • How can you buy happiness?
  • How to be grateful for what you have... Both experiences and possessions
  • Bill Gates takes "think weeks" -- Why we all should do this
  • Warren Buffett can buy anything he wants... But he cannot buy time
  • Gretchen describes her typical day
  • The Four Tendencies (Personality Profiles) -- How you respond to expectations
    • Upholders - Respond readily to both outer expectations and inner expecations
    • Questioners - Question all expectations; they meet an expectation only if they believe it's justified, so in effect they respond only to inner expectations
    • Obligers - Respond readily to outer expectations but struggle to meet inner expectations
    • Rebels - Resist all expectations, outer and inner alike
  • A live role play between Gretchen and me describing which tendency we inhibit and why we are different
  • Questioner vs Upholder - An upholder wants to always follow the rules (Gretchen)... A questioner (me) thinks differently
  • Gretchen's advice - Get clarity on who you are, your personality profile, and how you respond to expectations
    • Questioner - Why are you doing this? Know who, what when, why?
    • Obliger - Go beyond. Let's both commit. Find outer accountability. Take action
    • Rebel - Freedom, choice. "I want my voice heard."Influence change

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Nov 20, 2017

Episode 232: It's Time To Go ALL IN (With Doug Meyer & Greg Meredith)

"Here's the issue:If you're going to pursue a low odds game, the reality is that at some point the odds will go to zero if you don't commit fully. You're never going to get across that chasm if you're going to keep yourself tethered to one side but that doesn't mean taking an unfounded leap into the wild beyond." Jim Collins gave me that advice on Episode #216 here On The Learning Leader Show. I've fired a lot of bullets over the past three years building this show and this platform while working a full time job at a big international corporation. The purpose of this episode is to announce that I have left my full time job to pursue my passion... My love: This show, this platform, this work, on a full time basis. It's time for me to go All In.

The featured leaders tonight are two of my business partners (and friends), Doug Meyer and Greg Meredith.  Doug Meyer is one of the founding partners of Brixey & Meyer.  In his role as Managing Director, Doug serves as a trusted business advisor to Business Owners, CEOs, CFOs and Boards of Advisors, driving value and accountability.  Greg Meredith runs Brixey & Meyer’s Business Advisory Services team, which helps clients with strategic planning, project management, sales strategy, business process and system optimization and more.  I am bringing The Learning Leader brand to Brixey & Meyer full time to run the Leadership Advisory Services team.  In addition to the podcast, I'll be focused on helping clients be more effective leaders, managers, and coaches.  This is done through: consulting projects, 1 on 1 coaching, leadership circles (Mastermind groups), creating written content (book and articles online), and much more.  I could not be more excited to get started!

 "Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now." - Naval Ravikant

Show Notes:

  • 3:06 - My career, what I've done, why I haven't named the companies I've worked for, who has supported this, who hasn't.
  • 5:05 - Why I'm making this move to do it full time, the first lunch I had with Doug, the impact that lunch had on me, how long this has been in the works, advice that was given to me... The phone call I made to my wife Miranda after that meeting informing her of what I wanted to do...
  • 6:40 - The exercise that Doug and I did -- "Write down everything you love to do... And write down the things people have paid for.  Let's build the business based on that information." -- The dream job scenario
  • 8:03 Doug sharing why Brixey & Meyer is different from other firms and why... - The values: Having fun, providing value, passionate, driver of change, accountability, responsibility to the people of the firm
  • 10:01 Doug sharing how The Learning Leader Show has positively impacted his life
  • 11:48 - Greg describing The Business Advisory Practice he leads at Brixey & Meyer
  • 12:07 - How Brixey & Meyer evolves and adapts -- Taking it to another level
  • 13:02 - Why I decided to leave my job as VP of Sales at a large international company
  • 14:09 - Finding a way to love what you do everyday
  • 14:44 - “Following your genuine intellectual curiosity is a better foundation for a career than following whatever is making money right now.” - Naval Ravikant
  • 16:24 - The scary part about making this change -- Side hustle to full time job creates a lot of pressure
  • 16:56 - The incredible support from all of the people at Brixey & Meyer
  • 17:47 - Why I'm motivated by people who believe in me... And my desire to prove them right
  • 18:52 - "You're work is going to fill a large part of your life... And the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.  And the only way to do great work is to love what you do." - Steve Jobs
  • 19:34 - The biggest challenge for Doug (managing my expectations)
  • 20:25 - Doug describing that this was an opportunistic hire... Not something they were looking for, but why it was a no brainer when the opportunity arose
  • 21:52 - The day to day actions - Helping leaders be more effective. Keynote speeches, leadership circles (Mastermind groups), Consulting projects, producing podcasts, creating content (books, online courses/articles), and much more
  • 25:18 - Doug and Greg describing their current leadership circles and why they've been so effective (and will continue to be)
  • 27:53 - The power in the peer to peer learning model that is created from Leadership Circles
  • 29:22 - Rapid fire questions (for Ryan):
    • Dream guest? Elon Musk
    • Favorite thing to do with my daughters? Coach their sports teams
    • Learn more from success or failure? I remember my failures more, but I try to learn from both success and failure
    • Most impactful book in the last 12 months? The Wright Brothers by David McCullough
    • Favorite episode? #078 With Kat Cole
  • 33:13 - Rapid fire questions (for Doug):
    • Favorite episode of The Learning Leader Show? #200 With Keith Hawk & AJ Hawk
    • Smartest person in the Meyer family? daughter, Jocelyn Meyer
    • Are you a Visionary or Integrator? Tough question. People think of him more as an integrator
    • Best Advice: From Bill Matthews - "I was frustrated with team members." And Bill said, "Doug, it's not them, it's you."
  • 36:37 - How will you define success? "Success is fun. I want this to be fun. We are going to add value and be agile."
  • 38:38 - The phone call I made to Doug when he thought I was turning him down...
  • 39:06 Why 99 out of 100 people would not have left the corporate job to do this?  Doug's thoughts... And why I did.
  • 40:35 - Defining your personal hedgehog
  • 41:46 - The unique qualities I will bring to this role -- What's different from books or articles
  • 45:54 - How I define the makeup of a great leader... The qualities they possess
  • 48:43 - “The path to fulfillment in life, to emotional satisfaction, is to find what really excites you and channel your all into it.” - Rich Roll
  • 49:01 - Doug describing his beliefs: Energy, Passion, Fun
  • 49:26 - Why Doug wanted me to be part of his business -- Natural curiosity, thought provoking questions, attitude, helping others
  • 51:06 - What's most important -- To find your WHO
  • 51:47 - The story Doug shared that created an emotional and powerful moment... And convinced me to say, "Yes, I am doing this, I want to work with a guy with this much integrity, honesty, and love."
  • 55:28 - Doug's excitement to unleash the potential for what we can do
  • 56:45 - Acknowledging how instrumental Greg has been in the growth of The Learning Leader brand over the last three years. His honest feedback and mentor-ship has been monumental
  • 58:28 - One of my favorite artists, Tom Petty said "It's time to move on, it's time to get going. What lies ahead I have no way of knowing... But under my feet, baby, grass is growing, it's time to move on, it's time to get going."

"You're work is going to fill a large part of your life... And the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.  And the only way to do great work is to love what you do." - Steve Jobs

Social Media:

More Learning:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Nov 13, 2017

Episode 231: Michael Bungay Stanier - Say Less, Ask More, & Change The Way You Lead Forever

Michael is the Senior Partner at Box of Crayons, a company that helps organizations do less good work and more great work.
He’s the author of several books, including The Coaching Habit and Do More Great Work. Michael has written for or been featured in numerous publications including Business InsiderFast CompanyForbesThe Globe & Mail and The Huffington Post.  Michael left Australia 25 years ago to be a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University.  He was the first Canadian Coach of the Year.
At Box of Crayons, Michael and his team of facilitators teach 10-minute coaching so busy managers build stronger teams and get better results. Clients come from all sectors and include Box, the United Nations, Gartner, the University Health Network and USAA. A sought-after speaker, Michael regularly speaks to businesses and organizations and has delivered keynotes at Leadership, HR and Learning & Development, conferences around the world.

The Learning Leader Show

"If you can't coach in 10 minutes or less then you don't have the time to coach at all"

Show Notes:

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • "They probably haven't sustained it. It's really hard."
    • Role Models -- They succeed AND they fail.  "You can't hit it out of the park every time"
    • Some times you do it all right and you still fail
    • Resilience and persistence are commonalities among people who have success
  • Michael's list of failures "is long"
  • The incredible story of how Michael was initially rejected as a Rhodes Scholar... And then how he persevered to earn it (the story about how he differentiated himself from the others is fantastic)
    • "Purple suit, long hair" -- "Everyone else had a blue suit, white shirt, red tie"
  • Where did he develop so much courage?
    • From his parents  -- They gave him unconditional support to be different and unique
  • He's a bit of a rebel who also follows the rules sometimes
    • Ask yourself "Do I want to be playing this game?"
  • Box of Crayons -- A training company on how to coach in 10 minutes
    • The mistake of saying "yes" to everyone who asked for his help when he started the company
  • Jim Collins -- "Fire bullets and then cannonballs" -- Low risk experiments
  • The 3 ways coaching shows up in corporations
    • Executive coaching -- People at the top of the Org Chart
    • Training internal people to be the corporate training team
    • Train all managers/leaders to be more coach like -- This is what Michael and his team does
  • "If you can't coach in 10 minutes or less then you don't have the time to coach at all"
  • Transforming to be more "coach like"
  • The 7 important questions to ask:
    • What's on  your mind?
    • And what else?
    • What's the real challenge here for you?
    • What do you want?
    • How can I help?
    • If you're saying yes to this, what are you saying no to?
    • What was most useful to you?
  • Why most 1 on 1's are terrible
  • The first and last questions are vital (must bookend the meeting well) -- "Start fast and end strong"
  • The Learning moments -- Help them learn. They learn when there is a moment to reflect on what just happened
  • Be careful when "the advice monster" kicks in... "Can you stay curious a little longer?" -- As the coach, you need to.  You must solve the correct problem and focus on the person you are coaching
    • If you just give advice, very little brain activity happens. If you ask questions, it grows the brain activity...
  • Coaching for performance vs. Coaching for development -- There is a big difference
  • The best question in the world is... "And what else?" -- It helps them go a level deeper.  Keep asking it, keep going deeper
  • "Be lazy, be curious, be often" -- Michael's motto towards coaching. Listen, ask questions, help them learn
  • "Be more coach like"
  • "Help them learn rather than teaching them" -- We do this by asking great questions
  • Learning Leader = "A great coach is a great teacher.  A learning leader is the essence of what it means to be a great leader." You help people learn by constantly learning more yourself

"Less Advice. More Curiosity."

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Nov 6, 2017

Episode 230: Dorie Clark - How To Monetize Your Expertise & Create Multiple Income Streams

  • Commonalities of leaders who sustain excellence:
    • They do what they say they're going to do -- Have integrity
    • They have a great ability to focus.  They don't get distracted.
    • They have patience
  • Principles:
    • Create multiple streams of income -- However, don't try to create them all at once.  Patience. 1 or 2 at a time.
      • A steady progression.  Add 1 or 2 per year.
      • Dorie has 8 income streams.
      • "If you're relying on one paycheck, from one employer,  you may be courting disaster."
  • Dorie was laid off on September 10, 2001 -- She received a 4 day severance package... A highly stressful time. "Never be reliant on just one employer"
  • "Side hustles make you a better employee, it liberates you." -- "You can speak truth to power"
  • Dorie's 8 Streams of Revenue:
    • Consulting
    • Executive Coaching
    • Writing Books
    • Teaching at Duke
    • Keynote Speeches
    • Online Courses
    • Affiliate Marketing
    • Mastermind Groups
  • Dorie's online course "Become A Recognized Expert"
    • Create the content
    • Social Proof -- Credibility
    • Strong network -- To be recognize, need to be an expert and have others share the message
  • We discussed the goals Dorie set from her first time on the show (2 years ago):
    • Double email list
    • Have a best selling book
    • Get a girlfriend
  • The importance of joint ventures
  • Why Dorie wants to become an Italian citizen
  • "The thing that gives you courage is the market rate" -- "No one is a competitor"
  • "When someone asks you your fee, find the number that makes you scared and then add 10%"
  • Doing TEDx Switzerland
  • How to build online courses:
    • Surveyed audience -- 1,200 responses
    • Pilot course at discounted rate ($500)
    • Final course ($2,000) -- Premium content, premium price
    • Total cost -- $1,200 (had 150 students paid in full)
    • Video module type courses are lower cost and not as much engagement
    • The $2,000 course has regular follow up and conversations with Dorie in addition to the video work.  Interaction with others in a Facebook group chat as well. -- It has 40+ hours of content created for it... And webinars
    • Dorie Clark is a marketing strategy consultant, professional speaker, and frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review. Recognized as a “branding expert” by the Associated Press, Fortune, and Inc. magazine, she is the author of Entrepreneurial You (Harvard Business Review Press,), Reinventing You, and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of 2015 by Inc. magazine and one of the Top 10 Business Books of the Year by Forbes. It was also a Washington Post bestseller.

      Clark, whom the New York Times described as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives,” consults and speaks for a diverse range of clients, including Google, the World Bank, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, the Ford Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Yale University.  At age 14, Clark entered Mary Baldwin College’s Program for the Exceptionally Gifted. At 18, she graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Smith College, and two years later received a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School.

Oct 29, 2017

Episode 229: Henry Cloud - "Be So Good They Can't Ignore You"

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

"If you're a leader, you will get what you create or what you allow."

Show Notes:

  • Henry constantly striving to do more... Why?
    • "I'm a practitioner, need to continue doing the work"
  • Advice to "normal" people who have a 9-5 job. Henry was willing to start with very little money, but grew into his passion slowly and kept at it.
  • Inflection points -- My football career.  Henry's gradual growth. Critical mass moments -- Henry did leadership coaching and consulting from day 1.
  • "You have to love what you do."
  • "You have to get moving."
  • "My first book Integrity was written based on my teaching for 15 years." 
  • Boundaries -- A simple, yet profound concept - A property line: This is you
  • "In relationships, people put pressure on us"
  • Leaders are "ridiculously in charge"  -- "If you're leading it, you're in charge"
  • "If you're a leader, you will get what you create or what you allow"
  • 3 Keys to Executive Success (Executive Functions Of The Brain):
    • Attend to most important/what's relevant -- Need to name the priority -- Boundary of Attention
    • No multi-tasking. Your brain CANNOT do this -- Inhibit everything else
    •  Working memory - Must be a flow to it
  • Advice for listeners who have a bad boss?
    • Don't fret, we've all been there
    • Create your own culture, do lunch and learns, build what you want within the situation 
  • Vision Statement -- Get so good they will say, "What are they doing?" How do we grow? How can we do that?"
    • Perform, develop leaders in your own corner of the world/buisness
  • "Be So Good They Can't Ignore You"
  • "They work their butt off"
Oct 22, 2017

Episode 228: Renee Mauborgne - How To Make Competition Irrelevant (Blue Ocean Strategy)

Renee Mauborgne is the co-author of the global bestseller Blue Ocean Strategy and the just released, indispensable follow-up, BLUE OCEAN SHIFT: Beyond Competing – Proven Steps to Inspire Confidence and Seize New GrowthBLUE OCEAN SHIFT is a New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today Bestseller, and an International Bestseller. Her book Blue Ocean Strategy has sold over 3.6 million copies and is recognized as one of the most iconic and impactful strategy books ever written. It is being published in a record-breaking 44 languages and is a bestseller across five continents. 

She served on President Barack Obama’s Board of Advisors on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) for the President’s two terms. She is also a Fellow of the World Economic Forum. Renee is ranked in the top 3 management gurus in the world in the Thinkers50 listing of the World’s Top Management Gurus. She is the highest placed woman ever on Thinkers50. 

 

"If you're going to look at other people, you're going to look like other people."

Show Notes:

  • Common Themes of Leaders who Sustain Excellence:
    • Not focused on competing with others
      • They create their own space, independent point of view
    • Always interested in learning. Focused on pieces of information
      • Insatiable curiosity, high level learner, a note taker
    • Enormous propensity for hard work
      • Smart people don't look for short cuts
    • Willing to reinvent self if needed
  • How to not compare yourself to others?
    • "Focus on  delivering a leap in value -- they will come to you."
    • "I don't look at social media. I look at how creative people are."
    • "We are all far more creative than we think we are"
    • "If you're going to look at other people, you're going to look like other people"
  • Blue Ocean Strategy - What is it?
    • Most companies focus on existing conditions, red oceans, bloody, with sharks
    • Blue ocean companies/people "don't focus on competing, they focus on creating"
  • How can this help someone with a side hustle? Or someone who wants to create a side hustle?
    • Don't go into red oceans - don't do what everyone else does - Create your own distinctive space
      • "It's not about market competing, it's about market creating"
  • When people talk about startups, they think "disrupt" -- Renee prefers "non disruptive creation"
    • Tony Robbins didn't disrupt anything. He created a new market (life coaching). He helped create a $2B market
    • The idea of David killing Goliath is romantic but it doesn't typically work that way
  • New industry recently created -- Viagra, Sesame Street, Coaching to get into MBA school, YouTube stylist, Bumble
  • Growth model
    • Solve a new problem (ie. Cyber Security)
    • Redefine the problem the industry focuses on -- Cirque du Soleil -- "Circus and theatre"
    • AirBnB
  • Expand the opportunity scope
    • "Are there patterns that allow them to be linked"
    • "Creation is not a black box"
  • Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos look to deliver overwhelming value, they do not compete

"It's not about market competing. It's about market creating."

Social Media:

Oct 15, 2017

Episode 227: Jeff Goins - How To Be A Thriving Artist (Real Artists Don't Starve)

Jeff Goins is a writer, keynote speaker, and award-winning blogger with a reputation for challenging the status quo. He is the best-selling author of five books, including Real Artists Don't Starve, and The Art of Work, which landed on the best­ seller lists of USA Today, Publisher’s Weekly, and the Washington Post. His website Goinswriter.com is visited by millions of people every year. Jeff was previously on The Learning Leader Show Episode #028

The Learning Leader Show

What does it take to stand out? "Show UP, Do the Work, and most importantly: FOLLOW UP. Nobody does this."

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence. Common Themes of Leaders who Sustain Excellence:
    • Passion - A fire to pursue their "why"
    • Discipline - Daily habits, routines, rituals to be best every day
      • Coach K -- Sit down and analyze after every single game to improve
    • Great Learners - Hungry learner. How to do it better?
  • Real Artists don't starve
  • Starving artist vs. Thriving artist
  • The myth of the starving artist
  • Why Michelangelo was a thriving (rich) artist
  • "Do you really have to starve to be an artist?" -- No
  • You aren't born an artist (or a Leader) -- It's a result of the choices you make. The human brain is malleable. A person can learn and master a craft.
  • "Leaders are made. Artists are made."
  • The story of John Grisham -- A lawyer who wrote novels on the side.
    • He wrote one page a day for years... And then he had a novel
  • You can gradually re-create yourself
  • Wake up a little earlier every day and do the work. Make it a habit
    • Change happens slowly
  • The way we talk about it is not actually the way we do it.
  • We do not need to take a giant risk. When we look at the facts, we can take measured risks
  • 2 Resources at The University of Wisconsin -- A study of 5,000 entrepreneurs
    • The Two Types
      • Burn The Boats -- 33% more likely to fail
      • Side Hustlers -- People who didn't initially go "All In" statistically were more likely to succeed
      • It took Jeff two years to quit his job. He built one year of runway
  • The rule of apprenticeship -- Ryan Holiday - Be an Anteambulo. Clear the path for others
  • A "master piece" came from the time of Michaelangelo
  • What it takes to stand out -- Show up, do the work, FOLLOW UP (nobody does this), show what you've learned, help others
  • Jeff has lunch every Wednesday with a mentee -- Rarely do they follow up. Do this.
    • "The best thing you can do is take notes, and follow up. Put it into action."
  • Jeff was/is mentored by Michael Hyatt -- He followed up constantly
  • How do you do X? "It's easy to talk about stuff, it's hard to do it."
  • "If you're teachable, it puts you in a class of people that sits apart."
  • Do not work for free -- The rule of value
    • Charging brings dignity to the work
    • "Working for free is often not the opportunity we think it is"

"Leaders are made. Artists are made." -- "You aren't born an artists."

Social Media:

 

Oct 8, 2017

Episode 226: Steve Wojciechowski - How To Win Every Day

Steve Wojciechowski is the head basketball coach at Marquette University. He has has enjoyed a wealth of success in collegiate basketball as both a player and a coach. Wojo has established his “Win Every Day” philosophy as the foundation for the Marquette program. Wojciechowski also served as court coach and scout for the USA Basketball Men's National Team. He helped lead on-court duties as well as game preparation from 2006-12, including the program's gold-medal performance at the 2008 Beijing Olympics and 2012 London Olympics. The Olympic teams included NBA greats such as Marquette alumnus Dwyane Wade, Kobe Bryant and LeBron James.

As a player, Wojciechowski ("Wojo") was named the top defensive player in the country his senior year, a two-time All-ACC choice and honorable mention Associated Press All-America. He appeared in 128 career games for the Blue Devils and earned 88 starting assignments.

The Learning Leader Show

"My greatest edge was that I didn't think I had an edge."

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence. Common Themes of Leaders who Sustain Excellence:
    • Passion - A fire to pursue their "why"
    • Discipline - Daily habits, routines, rituals to be best every day
      • Coach K -- Sit down and analyze after every single game to improve
    • Great Learners - Hungry learner. How to do it better?
  • WIN Everyday - daily process to pursue excellence in every way. Basketball is a vehicle for that (for Steve)
  • Develop trust - "Not always done quickly, but definitely done intentionally. Must be consistent, you must do what you say you will do"
  • Wojo's Dad's hard hat -- It's hanging up at his house as a reminder of what hard work looks like
    • "The first great team I was on was the Wojciechowski team. My dad was a longshoreman. Did hard work and hard labor."
  • Going to Jesse Itzler and Sara Blakely's retreat. A 90 yard hill, 40% grade... An endurance race
    • Growth - Getting outside of your comfort zone
  • "As a long time listener of your show, I marvel at your guests"
  • "My greatest edge was that I didn't think I had an edge"
  • Why it was important to be teamed with Russians and other international players who didn't speak English at a high school all star camp
  • Coach Krzyzewski (Coach K)'s reason for excellence:
    • Ability to build relationships with players as people
      • Incredible communication skills
      • Intentionally taking time to build relationships
    • Preparation - Disciplined preparation
      • Habits, routines
      • "His preparation on a daily basis is championship level"
  • How has Coach K showed Level 5 leadership to help his assistant coaches be great when they earn their own head coaching job?
    • "He allows coaches to take ownership - He pushed them and allowed them to have a voice. On the job learning"
  • Culture
    • Start with your value system: What do you believe in? How do you build it?
  • Wojo's Stated Values:
    • Pursuing excellence - WIN every day
    • Being Selfless
    • Being Accountable - "Do what you say you're going to do"
    • Being Relentlessly competitive
    • Discipline - Do what need to do at the time it needs to be done
  • How is it coaching millennials?
    • There is a lot of noise. Continuous feedback loop. Need to be constantly engaged. But kids still want the same things... They want to grow, want discipline, be part of something special... Something bigger than them
    • How to communicate with young people?
      • Social media: Must use it, need to be there
      • Spend most time face to face with them
  • Typical day?
    • Be intentional about how allocate time
    • Plan ahead -- Must cover what's most important. Must prioritize
    • Control own energy - Track sleep and work out daily
    • Set weekly goals (write them down) for face to face interactions, time to learn/read/podcast listening, time with family/friends. Carry a book to help keep track
      • "Sometimes I fail, sometimes I crush it"
  • Read The Compound Effect by Darren Hardy
  • Read Legacy
  • Learning Leader - I was first turned on to the show because of the title.
    • Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, Kevin Durant - "Their ability to learn was what I was impressed with most about them. LeBron remembered everything you said."

"How"Their ability to learn was what I was impressed with most. LeBron remembered everything you said." -- Wojo discussing his time coaching Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, and Kevin Durant

Oct 1, 2017

Episode 225: Dan Heath - The Power Of Defining Moments

Dan Heath is a Senior Fellow at Duke University’s CASE center, which supports social entrepreneurs. At CASE, he founded the Change Academy, a program designed to boost the impact of social sector leaders.

Dan is the co-author, along with his brother Chip, of three New York Times bestsellers: DecisiveSwitch, and Made to Stick. Amazon.com’s editors named Switch one of the Best Nonfiction Books of the Year, and it spent 47 weeks on the New York Times Bestseller list. Made to Stick was named the Best Business Book of the Year and spent 24 months on the BusinessWeek bestseller list. Their books have been translated into over 30 languages.

Previously, Dan worked as a researcher and case writer for Harvard Business School. In 1997, Dan co-founded an innovative publishing company called Thinkwell, which continues to produce a radically reinvented line of college textbooks.

Dan has an MBA from Harvard Business School and a BA from the Plan II Honors Program from the University of Texas at Austin. One proud geeky moment for Dan was his victory in the 2005 New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest, beating out 13,000 other entrants. He lives in Durham, NC.

What have you failed at this week?" "There's no such thing as a good mentor who doesn't push you."

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence. Common Themes of Leaders who Sustain Excellence:
    • Decision making - The ability to make a string of good decisions
      • Avoid traps
      • Narrow framing -- Cannot just think of 1 option
  • Decisions are often made because of political reasons, persuasive people, or PowerPoint... They should be made through experiments instead
  • The process of writing with his brother Chip Heath
    • 10 year age gap (54-44)
    • They are different people. The work is the glue for their relationship
    • Chip is a professor at Stanford Graduate School of Business
    • The life changing effect of their book Switch. They hit the jackpot --> Time magazine, The Today Show
  • What is it that allows change to happen?
    • Our brains are wired with two independent systems:
      • Rational
      • Emotional
        • What makes change difficult is when those 2 disagree... The same forces are at place within organizations. The heart of Switch -- The emotional side is stronger than the rational side. We must get that in order to change.
  • How do we make an experience better? -- We must take the reins to make a moment better
    • The John Deere new hire experience -- You leave your first day thinking "Wow, I belong here." They intentionally take care of their people.
    • Transition moments are so important. We need to pay attention to them and be aware. --> Graduation, weddings, retirement, first day at a new job, etc
      • "Cultures pay attention to big moments"
  • Sara Blakely story growing up... The question her Dad asked her and her siblings at the dinner table -- "What have you failed at this week?"
    • We need to get comfortable with trying new things... And failing sometimes. It builds resilience, GRIT
  • David Scott Yaeger 2 part formula for mentors and mentees
    • High Standards + Assurance -- "I have high expectations for you... And I know you can do it."
    • "There's no such thing as a good mentor who doesn't push you." -- STRETCH
  • The powerful story of Eugene O'Kelly and how he chose to live his life when he found out he had 3 months left to live
    • "I experienced more Perfect moments and Perfect days in two weeks than I had in the last 5 years or than I probably would have in the next 5 years had my life continued without the diagnosis."
    • Look at your own calendar, do you see perfect days ahead? Could you create 30 perfect days? What would it take to motivate you to create a Perfect Moment?

"How Look at your own calendar, do you see perfect days ahead? Could you create 30 perfect days? What would it take to motivate you to create a Perfect Moment?"

 

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by Callaway Golf. We have partnered to give away The #1 selling Driver in 2017.  The Callaway GBB Epic Driver.  This club is valued at $499 and we are giving one away to a loyal listener of the show.  To enter the drawing: Tweet (or post on Instagram) a favorite leadership quote from an episode of The Learning Leader Show and tag/@ me on Twitter or Instagram.

Sep 24, 2017

Mike McDerment is the co-founder and CEO of FreshBooks, the world’s #1 cloud accounting software for self-employed professionals. Built in 2003 after he accidentally saved over an invoice, Mike spent 3.5 years growing FreshBooks from his parents’ basement. Since then, over 10 million people have used FreshBooks to save time billing, and collect billions of dollars.

The Learning Leader Show

"We give trust to earn trust. Lead with trust. That's the world I want to live in."

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence. Common Themes of Leaders who Sustain Excellence:
    • Been through something hard
    • Strong morals - set of values, make upstanding decisions, believe in people, don't compromise
    • Creative
    • Surround self with great people
    • Strong desire to grow
    • Default Trust to "ON"
  • First Principles -- Distill things down to underlying system: The act of taking a problem and breaking it down
  • Building FreshBooks -- "I didn't know anything about anything."
  • The #1 place to work -- have won awards for their culture
  • What do you do? "We are in the business of saving people time."
  • Moving to his parents basement to start the business... Running lean
  • Culture takes deliberate thought
    • Must have people who are diverse but share your values
    • Need guidelines/rule sets
  • The 9 Values:
    • Passion - Love your craft
    • Ownership
    • Results
    • Change - Bring learning and growth
    • Honesty
    • Fun - Deliberately make it fun
    • Empathy
    • Strive - Stretch
    • Trust
    • Secrecy - Open inside, but nothing leaves from inside
  • Values/Culture used in 2 ways
    • Publicly recognize people living the values
    • Swiftly eliminate people who don't embody those values - Listen, hear, be open. Recognize that cultures need to be hacked, evolve, change.
  • Inner office dating? Why is that promoted? What does it mean?
  • Everyone spends the first month in customer service. All build that foundation -- Why they prolong onboarding and how that leads to long term success
  • Make decisions today to win in 3-5 years
  • Decided to re-platform even though the rule is to "never re-write or re-platform"
  • "How do you minimize risk, but maximize impact?"
  • "Something that no one had ever done before. Create a new company in secret."
  • Lead with trust: "We give trust to earn trust. Lead with trust. That's the world I want to live in."
  • Imposter Syndrome and FEAR. Embracing it
  • "Getting comfortable with being uncomfortable" -- It's the path to growth. Nobody has all of the answers
  • Advice to 20 year old -- He was lost, not doing well. Realize that everyone else is too. Nobody knows what they are doing even if it looks like they do."
  • Read -- E Myth (Michael Gerber), Idea Virus (Seth Godin), Execution (Ram Charan)
  • Learning Leader -- Per Mike, "That's me." The challenge & personal growth.

"How do you minimize risk and maximize impact?"

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

Sep 17, 2017

The Learning Leader Show

223: Kim Malone Scott - Using Radical Candor To Be A Great Boss

"It is important for leaders to be learners, not tellers."

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence. Common Themes of Leaders who Sustain Excellence:
    • They care about their people as humans, they care personally
    • They are honest, not worried about being liked all the time, they are willing to challenge directly
  • Can you be both liked and respected?
    • Yes, but you shouldn't strive to be popular
  • Jony Ive and Steve Jobs story -- Steve told them the team their work was of poor quality. Jony said, "Why were you so harsh Steve?" Steve asked, "Why didn't you tell them the work was bad? It's your job to do that." Jony replied, "I didn't want them to be upset or distraught." Steve said, "You are vain. You just want to be liked."
  • The biggest mistake new bosses make is trying to be liked by everyone and NOT being direct.
  • Your employees should never have to say, "Why didn't you tell me sooner?" -- A great boss gives directly feedback in a timely manner
  • A great boss creates an environment where everyone can tell the truth (up, down, and sideways in an organization)
  • Understand the framework
  • How to created this culture?
    • Start by asking for feedback. You can't give feedback if you're not willing to take it.
    • Go to question: "What could I be doing to make it better for you?"
    • Use a "Start, Stop, Continue" exercise
  • Create a "Speak Truth To Power" environment
  • Embrace the discomfort
  • "Listen with the intent to understand... Not just waiting to talk."
  • Must reward the candor -- When you receive good feedback, you must implement it. You must fix the problem.
  • Google/Sheryl Sandberg story
    • Sheryl's feedback: "You said "um" a lot during that presentation, would you like a speech coach?" -- "No, I'm fine, thanks." -- "Kim, when you say "um" every third word, it makes you sound stupid."
      • Sheryl knew she need to be very direct with Kim and they built a relationship of trust and care. That's the only way she was able to get through to Kim and help her
  • Hiring is the most important decision you will make as a leader
    • "If you're not dying to work with that person, don't hire them"
    • Steve Jobs - "It's better to have a hole than an asshole"
    • Dick Costolo - "You can't just hire great people and get out of their way. You must invest time in helping them, develop them even more."
  • Jony Ive - "New ideas are fragile. You must create space to talk about them."
  • "Your job as the boss isn't to be the decider, it's to make sure everyone knows who the decider is."
  • The Wright Brothers -- Watching birds for hours --> Learning how to build wings for human airplane flight
  • Dick Costolo -- Build in 2 hours of "think time" per day in your calendar
  • Career advice:
    • "Quit talk of building a great resume, build a great life"
    • Find people to have career talks with... Recount your life story with them. Zero in on changes you've made. Think "What motivates you about work?" Understand what drives you, what matters, why? -- Think about your dreams... Make sure your dreams and values are in alignment. Create a plan
  • "It is important for leaders to be learners, not tellers."

"When you say "Um" every third word, it makes you sound stupid." -- Sheryl Sandberg's direct feedback to Kim after a presentation to Larry & Sergei

 

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by Callaway Golf. We have partnered to give away The #1 selling Driver in 2017.  The Callaway GBB Epic Driver.  This club is valued at $499 and we are giving one away to a loyal listener of the show.  To enter the drawing: Tweet (or post on Instagram) a favorite leadership quote from an episode of The Learning Leader Show and tag/@ me on Twitter or Instagram.

Sep 10, 2017

Jon Acuff is back for a second time on The Learning Leader Show!

JON ACUFF is the author of five books, including the New York Times Bestseller Do Over. For nineteen years he’s helped companies like the Home Depot, Bose, Staples, and AutoTrader.com tell their stories. He’s a well-known public speaker, and his blogs have been read by millions of fans. His most recent book is: Finish - Give Yourself The Gift of Done.

If you'd like to listen to the first conversation Jon and I had on January 27, 2016, CLICK HERE.

Episode 222: Jon Acuff

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

Want to write a book? "What question are you willing to spend two years answering?"

Show Notes:

  • Why Jon dedicated this new book to his parents and their belief in him as a writer
    • His Dad was a pastor, a communicator. Have to learn how to shape ideas and be a speaker
  • What took so long for Jon to believe he was a writer?
    • "I'm a writer. When you do it enough, it becomes possible. I've written six books."
  • Why this book?
    • "People say, I like your book Start, but I never finish, how do I finish?"
  • Like Jim Collins, Jon says, "What is a question I'm willing to spend two years answering?"
  • 91% of Americans want to write a book and less than 1% of them do it
  • "I want this thing to be part of my life... This has multiple applications."
  • James Clear says it's the friction at the start... Lacing up the shoes and beginning the run.
    • Jon reply "Is it harder to buy a treadmill or use the treadmill?"
  • This is built on research. 900 participants. It is a data driven book
  • How to mix in humor... Why to study stand up comedians?
    • "I've watched 100 stand up comedians for every 1 business leader"
  • "If you want to enjoy the internet more, you must know it's not about you. It never is." -- People are thinking about themselves (Tracy McGrady & JR Smith)
  • Goal Setting:
    • Cut them in half, make the goals smaller
    • Test principles -- Look to be 5%-10% better
    • "Before I set a goal, I make sure it is the right size"
    • How this relates to setting sales goals/quotas in a big company
      • Need a culture of honesty and realistic goals in order to thrive, grow, and survive
    • "A goal is a promise to yourself"
  • "Make it fun if you want it done"
    • Satisfaction goes up
    • Performance goes up
  • How to get something done?
    • Reward
    • Fear
    • Which one do you better respond to? You need to know. How about the people that work for you? You need to know
  • How Jon will read 156 books this year
  • What is the story you want to tell your kids? 
  • Are you proud of what you do everyday?
  • "The old rules don't apply anymore... The faucet of freelance money can turn on."
  • Why do some have "the fear of success?"
    • Fear of money
    • Fear of high expectations
    • Self sabotage
    • Fear of "what's next?"

 

Sep 3, 2017

Episode 221: Phil Jones - What To Say To Influence And Impact Others (Magic Words)

Phil’s passion to “Teach The World To Sell”, now sees him traveling the globe speaking to a breadth of audiences, from small business owners to workforces and mass organizations, spreading his message and sharing his highly credited teachings. To date he’s spoken in 56 different countries across five continents and with his growing popularity, he’s expected to add many more to his roster.

Episode 221: Phil Jones - What To Say To Influence And Impact Others (Magic Words)

Subscribe on iTunes  or Stitcher Radio

The Learning Leader Show

"I Learned That Success Leaves Clues."

Show Notes:

  • Sustained Excellence:
    • Dogged determination
    • Curiosity - Continue to demand improvement from self
    • Detach self of the outcome - be of service to your customer. Celebrate quietly in the background when the client wins
  • How he learned to hustle:
    • Came from a home without much money... Learned to sell his mom's sandwiches at lunch. Then started a business going door to door offering to wash cars for money
    • He grew to make more money than his teachers when he was 15
      • "How much money are you making sire?" -- Phil would say to teachers when they criticized him for missing class
    • By 18, he was named the youngest sales manager in fashion retailer Debenhams, history
  • Day to Day
    • Phil delivers 100 keynote presentations a year
    • "Respect is something that is to be earned"
  • Ridiculous goal -- "Get my book in front of one million people"
  • Using Magic words
    • "I'm not sure if it's for you, but..."
  • "Magic words are words that speak right to the subconscious of our brain"
  • If you change 1 or 2 words, it can change everything. You must learn, train, and prepare... Write a script
    • "You still cry at movies... But the actor is reading a script. It's not real. You need to learn to read scripts."
  • Magic Word/Phrase
    • "You wouldn't happen to know..." -- Create a path of least resistance for a referral
  • How has Phil learned what he teaches?
    • "120,000 negotiations. Messing up. Being brave enough to say what works and what doesn't."
  • Magic Word/Phrase
    • "How open minded are you?" -- When you're trying to internally sell a new idea, this works. Everyone wants to see themselves as open minded. This phrase primes the brain to be more open minded to a new idea. It helps people opt in to your idea.
  • How to open a keynote speech?
    • Ask questions of the audience...
      • "Change one word to change everything" (Listen for more in depth story. This was a really good part. Around the 26:30 mark)
  • "Questions start conversations, conversations lead to relationships, relationships lead to opportunities."
  • Methods for prospecting:
    • You don't need to knock on every door
    • A great story on what you would do if you lost a child at a department store (again... must listen)
    • "Go look for who you really want." You must identify those people
    • Define who they are...
    • "You wouldn't happen to know?"
  • How he runs/manages his business and prospects
    • Franchises, MLMs, Healthcare space
    • Referrals, gifts, emails, calls
    • Utilizing Robert Cialdini's method for reciprocity... "They end up thanking ME!"
    • 3rd party credibility and permission
  • Magic Word/Phrase:
    • "Just one more thing..." -- TV detectives in the 80's and 90's
    • This helps both upsells AND downsells (sometimes you won't get the huge deal initially... Must work your way in to build the relationship starting small)
  • Magic Word/Phrase:
    • "Most People..." -- "This helps you tell people what to do without telling them what to do."
    • People love to be led. Example: Yelp reviews
    • When people are stuck being indecisive... "Look, what most people do..."
  • Learning Leader = Leaders are always learning. "You've never arrived. You're always becoming."
    • Good, Better, or Best: What do you want?
      • You want to be better... Always striving to improve

"Questions start conversations. Conversations lead to relationships. Relationships lead to opportunities."

Social Media:

More Learning:

Episode 078: Kat Cole – From Hooters Waitress To President of Cinnabon

Episode 216: Jim Collins -- How To Go From Good To Great

Episode 179: How To Sustain Excellence - The Best Answers From 178 Questions

Episode 107: Simon Sinek – Leadership: It Starts With Why

 

Episode edited by the great J Scott Donnell

The Learning Leader Show is supported by Callaway Golf. We have partnered to give away The #1 selling Driver in 2017.  The Callaway GBB Epic Driver.  This club is valued at $499 and we are giving one away to a loyal listener of the show.  To enter the drawing: Tweet (or post on Instagram) a favorite leadership quote from an episode of The Learning Leader Show and tag/@ me on Twitter or Instagram.

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